Difference between pages "Cloud Backup" and "Metro"

(Difference between pages)
 
(Initial Setup)
 
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This howto will describe a method for automatically backing up your funtoo install to the internet, in this case dropbox, but any online storage will do. Gentoo describes a method of creating a stage 4 archive. The problem with a stage 4 is that it is large and it archives a lot of unnecessary files. Such as applications that can be reinstalled from an emerge world. Instead, this method will aim for more of a "stage 3.5."
+
{{#layout:doc}}{{#widget:AddThis}}[[Metro]] is the build system for Funtoo Linux and [[Gentoo Linux]] stages. It automates the bootstrapping process.
  
{{fancynote| This method does not attempt to backup everything. The intention is only to backup the system. Optionally you can also archive and copy your <tt>/home</tt> folder if you have enough online storage.}}
+
This tutorial will take you through installing, setting up and running [[Metro]].
  
== Use Case ==
+
These other Metro documents are also available:
A backup machine currently provides network drives on a home LAN to allow clients on the LAN to backup to, using apps such as Time Machine (Mac) and Genie Timeline (Windows). As this machine ''is'' the backup machine it doesn't have anywhere to backup to itself. In this situation a backup solution is provided by backing up to somewhere online - dropbox. If a restore from the backup is required, the client machine's backups would be trashed, and the backup machine restored.
+
  
== Automatic Backup Archives With Etckeeper ==
+
{{#ask: [[Category:Metro]]
Etckeeper is a tool that is used to save versions of <tt>/etc</tt>, including meta-data in a version control repository such as git.
+
|format=ul
As etckeeper is not in the funtoo portage tree, layman is used to provide an overlay.
+
}}
=== Install etckeeper via layman ===
+
Before you install layman it is worth mentioning that you probably want <tt>USE="git subversion"</tt> in <tt>/etc/portage/make.conf</tt>. After adjusting use flags, to install layman you run:
+
<console>
+
###i## emerge layman
+
</console>
+
In order to backup the layman configuration, but not the portage overlay trees, make the following modifications to the default install.
+
Tell Portage about layman-fetched repositories by adding the following line to <tt>/etc/portage/make.conf</tt>:
+
  
<pre>
+
= Preface =
source /etc/layman/make.conf
+
</pre>
+
  
Modify the following lines in <tt>/etc/layman/layman.cfg</tt>:
+
== How Metro Works ==
  
<pre>
+
Metro is the Funtoo Linux automated build system, and is used to build Funtoo Linux stage tarballs.
storage  : /var/lib/layman
+
installed : /etc/layman/installed.xml
+
make_conf : /etc/layman/make.conf
+
</pre>
+
  
Add the bgo-overlay. As described on their web page, [http://bgo.zugaina.org/ bgo.zugaina.org].
+
[[Metro]] cannot create a stage tarball out of thin air. To build a new stage tarball, [[Metro]] must use an existing, older stage tarball called a "seed" stage. This seed stage typically is used as the ''build environment'' for creating the stage we want.
<console>
+
###i## layman -o http://gpo.zugaina.org/lst/gpo-repositories.xml -L
+
###i## layman -a bgo-overlay -o http://gpo.zugaina.org/lst/gpo-repositories.xml
+
</console>
+
  
More information about layman can be found here: http://www.gentoo.org/proj/en/overlays/userguide.xml
+
[[Metro]] can use two kinds of seed stages. Traditionally, [[Metro]] has used a stage3 as a seed stage. This stage3 is then used to build a new stage1, which in turn is used to build a new stage2, and then a new stage3. This is generally the most reliable way to build [[Gentoo Linux]] or Funtoo Linux, so it's the recommended approach.
 +
{{fancyimportant|'''After switching metro builds to Funtoo profile, Gentoo stages are no longer provided'''!}}
  
Then unmask and install etckeeper.
+
== Seeds and Build Isolation ==
<console>
+
###i## emerge etckeeper --autounmask-write
+
###i## emerge etckeeper
+
</console>
+
  
{{fancynote| To update layman overlays do:}}
+
Another important concept to mention here is something called ''build isolation''. Because [[Metro]] creates an isolated build environment, and the build environment is explicitly defined using existing, tangible entities -- a seed stage and a portage snapshot -- you will get consistent, repeatable results. In other words, the same seed stage, portage snapshot and build instructions will generate an essentially identical result, even if you perform the build a month later on someone else's workstation.
<console>
+
###i## layman -S
+
</console>
+
  
 +
== Local Build ==
  
If you see the following error -- apply this fix:
+
Say you wanted to build a new <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 tarball. The recommended method of doing this would be to grab an existing <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 tarball to use as your seed stage. [[Metro]] will be told to use this existing <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 to build a new stage1 for the same <tt>pentium4</tt>. For this process, the generic <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 would provide the ''build environment'' for creating our new stage1. Then, the new stage1 would serve as the build environment for creating the new <tt>pentium4</tt> stage2. And the new <tt>pentium4</tt> stage2 would serve as the build environment for creating the new <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3.
<console>
+
###i## emerge etckeeper
+
Calculating dependencies... done!
+
>>> Verifying ebuild manifests
+
!!! A file is not listed in the Manifest: '/var/lib/layman/bgo-overlay/sys-apps/etckeeper/files/etckeeper-gentoo-0.58.patch'
+
  
###i## cd /var/lib/layman/bgo-overlay/sys-apps/etckeeper
+
In the [[Metro]] terminology this is called a '''local build''', which means a stage3 of a given architecture is used to seed a brand new build of the same architecture. Incidentally this will be the first exercise we are going to perform in this tutorial.
###i## ebuild etckeeper-0.58-r2.ebuild manifest
+
###i## emerge etckeeper
+
</console>
+
  
== Configure etckeeper ==
+
A week later, you may want to build a brand new <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 tarball. Rather than starting from the original <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 again, you'd probably configure [[Metro]] to use the most-recently-built <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 as the seed. [[Metro]] has built-in functionality to make this easy, allowing it to easily find and track the most recent stage3 seed available.
Move any config files that do not live in <tt>/etc</tt>. i.e.
+
Check <tt>/root</tt> for any files to be archive, such as iptables scripts and move them to <tt>/etc</tt>.
+
  
{{fancynote| because funtoo uses [[Boot-Update]], this means <tt>/boot/grub/grub.cfg</tt> does not need to be archived.}}
+
== Remote Build ==
  
To ensure your portage world file is archived, make the following link:
+
[[Metro]] can also perform '''remote build''', where a stage3 of a different, but binary compatible, architecture is used as a seed to build a different architecture stage3. Consequentiality the second exercise we are going to perform in this tutorial will be to build a <tt>core2 32bit</tt> stage3 tarball from the <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 tarball we have just built.
<console>
+
###i## ln /var/lib/portage/world /etc/world
+
</console>
+
  
Initialise the git repository.
+
TODO: add caveats about what archs can be seeded and what can be not (maybe a table?)
<console>
+
###i## etckeeper init
+
Initialized empty Git repository in /etc/.git/
+
###i## etckeeper commit "Initial commit."
+
</console>
+
  
If you don't already have cron installed, emerge it now.
+
== Tailored Build ==
<console>
+
###i## emerge vixie-cron
+
</console>
+
And write the cron job to save an hourly version of <tt>/etc</tt>.
+
  
{{fancynote| git will only create a new version (commit) if there are changes from the previous one.}}
+
Last, it's also worthy noting that both in <tt>local</tt> and <tt>remote builds</tt>, [[Metro]] can be configured to add and/or remove individual packages to the final tarball.
Edit the file <tt>/etc/cron.hourly/etckeeper:
+
Let's say you can't live without <tt>app-misc/screen</tt>, at the end of this tutorial, we will show how to have your tailored stage3 to include it.
  
<pre>
+
== Installing Metro ==
#! /bin/bash
+
 
etckeeper commit "Hourly auto-commit"
+
'''The recommended and supported method''' is to use the Git repository of [[Metro]]. 
</pre>
+
 
 +
Ensure that {{Package|dev-vcs/git}} and {{Package|dev-python/boto}} (optional; required for EC2 support) are installed on your system:
  
== Encrypt and copy backups online ==
 
=== Copy To Dropbox ===
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## emerge dropbox
+
# ##i##emerge dev-vcs/git
 +
# ##i##emerge dev-python/boto
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
Add a dropbox user:
+
Next, clone the master git repository as follows:
 +
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## useradd dropbox
+
# ##i##cd /root
 +
# ##i##git clone git://github.com/funtoo/metro.git
 +
# ##i##cp /root/metro/metro.conf ~/.metro
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
Write the dropbox init files in <tt>/etc/conf.d/dropbox</tt>:
+
You will now have a directory called <tt>/root/metro</tt> that contains all the [[Metro]] source code.
  
<pre>
+
Metro is now installed. It's time to customize it for your local system.
DROPBOX_USERS="dropbox"
+
</pre>
+
<br>
+
<pre>
+
#!/sbin/runscript
+
# Copyright 1999-2004 Gentoo Foundation
+
# Distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License, v2 or later
+
# $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo-x86/sys-fs/dropbox/files/dropbox.init-1.0,v 1.4 2007/04/04 13:35:25 cardoe Exp $
+
  
NICENESS=5
+
= Configuring Metro =
  
depend() {  
+
{{Note|Metro is not currently able to build Gentoo stages. See {{Bug|FL-901}}.}}
    need localmount net
+
    after bootmisc
+
}  
+
  
start() {
+
[[User:Drobbins|Daniel Robbins]] maintains [[Metro]], so it comes pre-configured to successfully build [[Funtoo Linux]] releases. Before reading further, you might want to customize some basic settings like the number of concurrent jobs to fit your hardware's capabilities or the directory to use for produced stage archives. This is accomplished by editing <tt>~/.metro</tt> which is the [[Metro]]'s master configuration file.
    ebegin "Starting dropbox..."
+
    for dbuser in $DROPBOX_USERS; do
+
        start-stop-daemon -S -b -m --pidfile /var/run/dropbox-$dbuser.pid  -N $NICENESS -u $dbuser -v -e HOME="/home/$dbuser" -x /opt/dropbox/dropboxd
+
    done
+
    eend $?
+
}
+
  
stop() {
+
Please note that <code>path/install</code> must point to where metro was installed. Point <code>path/distfiles</code> to where your distfiles reside. Also set <code>path/mirror/owner</code> and <code>path/mirror/group</code> to the owner and group of all the files that will be written to the build repository directory, which by default (as per the configuration file) is at <code>/home/mirror/funtoo</code>. The cache directory normally resides inside the temp directory -- this can be modified as desired. The cache directory can end up holding many cached .tbz2 packages, and eat up a lot of storage. You may want to place the temp directory on faster storage, for faster compile times, and place the cache directory on slower, but more plentiful storage.
    ebegin "Stopping dropbox..."
+
    for dbuser in $DROPBOX_USERS; do
+
        start-stop-daemon --stop --pidfile /var/run/dropbox-$dbuser.pid
+
    done
+
    eend $?
+
}
+
  
status() {  
+
{{file|name=.metro|desc=Metro configuration|body=
    for dbuser in $DROPBOX_USERS; do
+
# Main metro configuration file - these settings need to be tailored to your install:
        if [ -e /var/run/dropbox-$dbuser.pid ] ; then
+
            echo "dropboxd for USER $dbuser: running."
+
        else
+
            echo "dropboxd for USER $dbuser: not running."
+
        fi
+
    done
+
    eend $?
+
}
+
</pre>
+
Start dropbox now and at boot time:
+
<console>
+
###i## chmod 0755 /etc/init.d/dropbox
+
###i## /etc/init.d/dropbox start
+
###i## rc-update add dropbox default
+
</console>
+
  
After starting the dropbox daemon, it will provide a http link. You will need to visit this site just once to associate your computer with your dropbox account.
+
[section path]
 +
install: /root/metro
 +
tmp: /var/tmp/metro
 +
cache: $[path/tmp]/cache
 +
distfiles: /var/src/distfiles
 +
work: $[path/tmp]/work/$[target/build]/$[target/name]
  
Write the cron job to make the backup archive and move it online. Edit the file <tt>/etc/cron.daily/backup</tt>:
+
[section path/mirror]
  
<pre>
+
: /home/mirror/funtoo
#! /bin/bash
+
owner: root
cd /etc
+
group: repomgr
git bundle create /tmp/backup.bundle --all
+
dirmode: 775
cd /tmp
+
mv -v -f backup.bundle /home/dropbox/Dropbox/Private/
+
</pre>
+
  
Make the script executable:
+
[section portage]
<console>
+
###i## chmod +x /etc/cron.daily/backup
+
</console>
+
  
=== Encrypt Backups ===
+
MAKEOPTS: auto
It is a good idea to encrypt your backup before moving it online. This can be done with gpg, using a symmetric (password only) or public/private key encryption. Additionally you can chose to sign the backup to check its integrity before restoring.
+
<console>
+
###i## emerge gpg
+
</console>
+
  
==== Symmetric Encryption ====
+
[section emerge]
There is no preparation required to use a symmetric key as all that is required is simply a passphrase.  Just modify the cron job. Edit <tt>/etc/cron.daily/backup</tt>:
+
  
<pre>
+
options: --jobs=4 --load-average=4 --keep-going=n
#! /bin/bash
+
cd /etc
+
git bundle create /tmp/backup.bundle --all
+
cd /tmp
+
echo 'encryption_password' | gpg -o backup.gpg --batch --homedir /root/.gnupg -vvv  --passphrase-fd 0 --yes -c backup.bundle
+
mv -v -f router.gpg /home/dropbox/Dropbox/Private/
+
</pre>
+
{{fancyimportant| Remember to change "encryption_password"}}
+
  
{{fancywarning| If you forget this password the backup will be unusable. Lose the password and you lose the backup.}}
+
# This line should not be modified:
 +
[collect $[path/install]/etc/master.conf]
 +
}}
  
As there is now sensitive information in this file, you might want to remove read permission:
+
== Arch and Subarch ==
<console>
+
###i## chmod og-r /etc/cron.daily/backup
+
</console>
+
  
==== Private/Public key Encryption ====
+
In the following example we are creating a pentium4 stage 3 compiled for x86-32bit binary compatibility. Pentium4 is a subarch of the x86-32bit architecture. Once you have metro installed you may find a full list of each subarch in your <tt>/root/metro/subarch</tt> directory each subarch will have the file extension .spec
Make a private/public encryption/decryptions key pair. The public key will be used to encrypt and the private key to decrypt.
+
Example:
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## gpg --gen-key
+
###i## ls /root/metro/subarch
 +
# ls subarch/
 +
amd64-bulldozer-pure64.spec  armv7a.spec          core-avx-i.spec        i686.spec        pentium.spec
 +
amd64-bulldozer.spec        armv7a_hardfp.spec  core2_32.spec          k6-2.spec        pentium2.spec
 +
amd64-k10-pure64.spec        athlon-4.spec        core2_64-pure64.spec    k6-3.spec        pentium3.spec
 +
amd64-k10.spec              athlon-mp.spec      core2_64.spec          k6.spec          pentium4.spec
 +
amd64-k8+sse3.spec          athlon-tbird.spec    corei7-pure64.spec      native_32.spec    pentiumpro.spec
 +
amd64-k8+sse3_32.spec        athlon-xp.spec      corei7.spec            native_64.spec    prescott.spec
 +
amd64-k8-pure64.spec        athlon.spec          generic_32.spec        niagara.spec      ultrasparc.spec
 +
amd64-k8.spec                atom_32.spec        generic_64-pure64.spec  niagara2.spec    ultrasparc3.spec
 +
amd64-k8_32.spec            atom_64-pure64.spec  generic_64.spec        nocona.spec      xen-pentium4+sse3.spec
 +
armv5te.spec                atom_64.spec        generic_sparcv9.spec    opteron_64.spec  xen-pentium4+sse3_64.spec
 +
armv6j.spec                  btver1.spec          geode.spec              pentium-m.spec
 +
armv6j_hardfp.spec          btver1_64.spec      i486.spec              pentium-mmx.spec
 
</console>
 
</console>
The public key is used to create the encrypted backup and needs to live on the computer being backed up. A copy of the private key needs to be made and stored securely in another place. If this machine becomes unbootable, and this is the only place the private key lives, the backup dies with it.
 
The private key should not be kept:
 
# In the same place as the back up
 
# On the machine being backed up
 
{{fancynote| The private key is the only key that will decrypt the backup. Lose this key and/or it's password and you lose the backup.}}
 
  
List the private keys:
+
= First stages build (local build) =
<console>
+
###i## gpg -K
+
/root/.gnupg/secring.gpg
+
------------------------
+
sec  2048R/0EF13559 2012-01-21
+
uid                  my_key <noone@example.com>
+
ssb  2048R/67417FEB 2012-01-21
+
</console>
+
  
The private key can be exported using either the key name or key number. In this case "my_key" or "0EF13559".
+
To get this all started, we need to bootstrap the process by downloading an initial seed stage3 to use for building and place it in its proper location in <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo</tt>, so that [[Metro]] can find it. We will also need to create some special &quot;control&quot; files in <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo</tt>, which will allow [[Metro]] to understand how it is supposed to proceed.
To cut and paste the key. Ie, if logging in remotely.
+
 
<console>
+
== Step 1: Set up pentium4 repository (local build) ==
###i## gpg -a --export-secret-key 0EF13559
+
 
</console>
+
Assuming we're following the basic steps outlined in the previous section, and building an unstable funtoo (<tt>funtoo-current</tt>) build for the <tt>pentium4</tt>, using a generic <tt>pentium4</tt> stage3 as a seed stage, then here the first set of steps we'd perform:
  
To create a key file:
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## gpg -o private_decryption.gpgkey --export-secret-key 0EF13559
+
# ##i##install -d /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4
 +
# ##i##install -d /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/snapshots
 +
# ##i##cd /home/metro/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4
 +
# ##i##install -d 2011-12-13
 +
# ##i##cd 2011-12-13
 +
# ##i##wget -c http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4/2011-12-13/stage3-pentium4-funtoo-current-2011-12-13.tar.xz
 +
# ##i##cd ..
 +
# ##i##install -d .control/version
 +
# ##i##echo "2011-12-13" > .control/version/stage3
 +
# ##i##install -d .control/strategy
 +
# ##i##echo local >  .control/strategy/build
 +
# ##i##echo stage3 > .control/strategy/seed
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
Now store this key somewhere secure. The backup is only as secure as the private key.
+
OK, let's review the steps above. First, we create the directory <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4</tt>, which is where Metro will expect to find unstable <tt>funtoo-current</tt> pentium4 builds -- it is configured to look here by default. Then we create a specially-named directory to house our seed x86 stage3. Again, by default, Metro expects the directory to be named this way. We enter this directory, and download our seed x86 stage3 from funtoo.org. Note that the <tt>2010-12-24</tt> version stamp matches. Make sure that your directory name matches the stage3 name too. Everything has been set up to match Metro's default filesystem layout.
 +
 
 +
Next, we go back to the <tt>/home/mirror/metro/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4</tt> directory, and inside it, we create a <tt>.control</tt> directory. This directory and its subdirectories contain special files that Metro references to determine certain aspects of its behavior. The <tt>.control/version/stage3</tt> file is used by Metro to track the most recently-built stage3 for this particular build and subarch. Metro will automatically update this file with a new version stamp after it successfully builds a new stage3. But because Metro didn't actually ''build'' this stage3, we need to set up the <tt>.control/version/stage3</tt> file manually. This will allow Metro to find our downloaded stage3 when we set up our pentium4 build to use it as a seed. Also note that Metro will create a similar <tt>.control/version/stage1</tt> file after it successfully builds an pentium4 funtoo-current stage1.
  
Modify the cron job at <tt>/etc/cron.daily/backup</tt>:
+
We also set up <tt>.control/strategy/build</tt> and <tt>.control/strategy/seed</tt> files with values of <tt>local</tt> and <tt>stage3</tt> respectively. These files define the building strategy Metro will use when we build pentium4 funtoo-current stages. With a build strategy of <tt>local</tt>, Metro will source its seed stage from funtoo-current pentium4, the current directory. And with a seed strategy of <tt>stage3</tt>, Metro will use a stage3 as a seed, and use this seed to build a new stage1, stage2 and stage3.
  
<pre>
+
== Step 2: Building the pentium4 stages ==
#! /bin/bash
+
cd /etc
+
git bundle create /tmp/backup.bundle --all
+
cd /tmp
+
gpg -o backup.gpg -r 'my-key' --batch --homedir /root/.gnupg -vvv  --passphrase-fd 0 --yes -e backup.bundle
+
mv -v -f backup.gpg /home/dropbox/Dropbox/Private/
+
</pre>
+
  
Replace "my-key" with the appropriate name from the key list.
+
Incidentally, if all you wanted to do at this point was to build a new pentium4 funtoo-current stage1/2/3 (plus openvz and vserver templates). You would begin the process by typing:
Also note the change from -c for symmetric encryption to -e for private/public key encryption
+
  
==== Sign Backups ====
 
Create a 2nd private/public (signing) key pair. The private key is used to sign and the public key is used to check the authenticity/integrity.
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## gpg --gen-key
+
# ##i##cd /root/metro
 +
# ##i##scripts/ezbuild.sh funtoo-current pentium4
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
{{fancynote| The password for this key will be required in the script below.}}
+
If you have a slow machine, it could take several hours to be completed because several "heavy" components like gcc or glibc have to be recompiled in each stage. Once a stage has been successfully completed, it is placed in the <tt>"${METRO_MIRROR}/funtoo-current/x32-bit/pentium4/YYYY-MM-DD"</tt> subdirectory, where <tt>YYYY-MM-DD</tt> is today's date at the time the <tt>ezbuild.sh</tt> script was started or the date you put on the ezscript.sh command line.
In this case the private key is required to sign the backup and the public key is used to check the integrity of the backup.
+
Follow a similar process as above to copy the public key to to another computer/storage media.
+
  
List the private keys:
+
= Building for another binary compatible architecture (remote build) =
<console>
+
###i## gpg -k
+
</console>
+
{{fancynote| <tt>-K</tt> lists private keys while <tt>-k</tt> lists public keys.}}
+
  
Then export this public key via cut and paste:
+
As written above, [[Metro]] is able to perform '''remote build''' building different architecture stage3 from a binary compatible seeding stage3 (e.g. using a pentium4 stage3 to seed a <tt>Intel Core2 32bits</tt> stage3).
<console>
+
###i## gpg -a --export <key name or number>
+
</console>
+
  
Or to create a key file:
+
In the Metro terminology this is called a '''remote build''' (a stage 3 of a different, but binary compatible, architecture is used as a seed).
<console>
+
What's not compatible? You can't use a <tt>Sparc</tt> architecture to generate an <tt>x86</tt> or <tt>ARM</tt> based stage and vice-versa. If you use a 32bit stage then you don't want to seed a 64bit build from it. Be sure that you are using a stage from the same architecture that you are trying to seed. Check [http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/funtoo/funtoo-current/ Funtoo-current FTP Mirror] for a stage that is from the same Architecture that you will be building. 
###i## gpg -o public_signing.gpgkey --export <key name or number>
+
</console>
+
  
Now store this key somewhere secure.
+
{{Note|Often, one build (ie. funtoo-current) can be used as a seed for another build such as funtoo-stable. However, hardened builds require hardened stages as seeds in order for the build to complete successfully.}}
  
Modify the backup cron job at <tt>/etc/cron.daily/backup</tt>:
+
== Step 1: Set up Core_2 32bit repository ==
  
<pre>
+
In this example, we're going to use this pentium4 funtoo-current stage3 to seed a new Core_2 32bit funtoo-current build. To get that done, we need to set up the pentium4 build directory as follows:
#! /bin/bash
+
cd /etc
+
git bundle create /tmp/backup.bundle --all
+
cd /tmp
+
echo 'signing_key_password' | gpg -s -o backup.gpg -r 'my-encryption-key' --batch --homedir /root/.gnupg -vvv  --passphrase-fd 0 --yes -e backup.bundle
+
mv -v -f backup.gpg /home/dropbox/Dropbox/Private/
+
</pre>
+
  
{{fancynote| the script will require the password for your private (signing) key to sign the backup. Replace "password" with the password for your signing private key.
 
And as there is sensitive information in this file don't forget to remove read permission.}}
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## chmod og-r /etc/cron.daily/backup
+
# ##i## cd /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit
 +
# ##i##install -d core2_32
 +
# ##i##cd core2_32
 +
# ##i##install -d .control/strategy
 +
# ##i##echo remote > .control/strategy/build
 +
# ##i##echo stage3 > .control/strategy/seed
 +
# ##i##install -d .control/remote
 +
# ##i##echo funtoo-current > .control/remote/build
 +
# ##i##echo x86-32bit > .control/remote/arch_desc
 +
# ##i##echo pentium4 > .control/remote/subarch
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
== To Restore From A Backup ==
+
The steps we follow are similar to those we performed for a ''local build'' to set up our pentium4 directory for local build. However, note the differences. We didn't download a stage, because we are going to use the pentium4 stage to build a new Core_2 32bit stage. We also didn't create the <tt>.control/version/stage{1,3}</tt> files because Metro will create them for us after it successfully builds a new stage1 and stage3. We are still using a <tt>stage3</tt> seed strategy, but we've set the build strategy to <tt>remote</tt>, which means that we're going to use a seed stage that's not from this particular subdirectory. Where are we going to get it from? The <tt>.control/remote</tt> directory contains this information, and lets Metro know that it should look for its seed stage3 in the <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4</tt> directory. Which one will it grab? You guessed it -- the most recently built ''stage3'' (since our seed strategy was set to <tt>stage3</tt>) that has the version stamp of <tt>2010-12-24</tt>, as recorded in <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4/.control/version/stage</tt>. Now you can see how all those control files come together to direct Metro to do the right thing.
This restore will assume your are starting with a new blank disk.
+
 
Start by performing a stage 3 install, upto and including section 5 "Chroot into your new system." http://www.funtoo.org/wiki/Funtoo_Linux_Installation
+
{{Note|<code>arch_desc</code> should be set to one of: <code>x86-32bit</code>, <code>x86-64bit</code> or <code>pure64</code> for PC-compatible systems. You must use a 32-bit build as a seed for other 32-bit builds, and a 64-bit build as a seed for other 64-bit builds.}}
  
Then the restore process is:
+
== Step 2: Building the Core_2 32bit stages ==
# Download backup from dropbox
+
# Decrypt
+
# Clone
+
# Link world file
+
# Emerge world
+
# Compile the kernel
+
# Restore grub bootloader
+
# Reboot
+
  
== Download backup from dropbox ==
+
Now, you could start building your new Core_2 32bit stage1/2/3 (plus openvz and vserver templates) by typing the following:
Log into your dropbox account and find your backup file. Move it to a public area if it isn't already in one. Then right click on it and click "copy public link."
+
Now on the computer to be restored, delete the contents of the /etc folder and download the backup file.
+
  
(Need to check if this needs done before chrooting into the new install).
 
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## cd /etc
+
# ##i##/root/metro/scripts/ezbuild.sh funtoo-current core2_32
###i## rm -rf *
+
###i## cd /tmp
+
###i## wget http://dl.dropbox.com/link-to-backup-file/backup.gpg
+
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
{{fancynote| if you have to copy the link from another computer and therefore can not cut and paste it, there is a "shorten link" option.}}
+
In that case, the produced stages are placed in the <tt>/home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x32-bit/core2_32/YYYY-MM-DD</tt> subdirectory.
  
== Decrypt ==
+
== Step 3: The Next Build ==
If you used a public/private key to encrypt, and optionally signed the backup, import the decryption and signing keys.
+
  
Note:
+
At this point, you now have a new Core_2 32bit stage3, built using a "remote" pentium4 stage3. Once the first remote build completes successfully, metro will automatically change <code>.control/strategy/build</code> to be <code>local</code> instead of <code>remote</code>, so it will use the most recently-built Core_2 32bit stage3 as a seed for any new Core_2 32bit builds from now on.
# The decryption key is the private key of the encryption key pair - private_decryption.gpgkey
+
# The signing key is the public key of the signing key pair - public_signing.gpgkey
+
  
To import the keys by cut and paste:
+
= Build your own tailored stage3 =
<console>
+
###i## gpg --import <<EOF
+
</console>
+
{{fancynote| The last line after pasting the key should be "EOF"}}
+
Repeat for both keys.
+
  
To import the keys by file:
+
Metro can be easily configured for building custom stage3 by including additional packages. Edit the following configuration file <tt>/root/metro/etc/builds/funtoo-current/build.conf</tt>:
<console>
+
{{file|name=funtoo-current/build.conf|body=
###i## gpg --import private_decryption.gpgkey
+
[collect ../../fslayouts/funtoo/layout.conf]
###i## gpg --import public_signing.gpgkey
+
</console>
+
  
Decrypt the backup:
+
[section release]
<console>
+
###i## gpg -d backup.gpg > backup.bundle
+
</console>
+
  
If the backup was signed and you have correctly imported the signing public key you should see a message similar to:
+
author: Daniel Robbins <drobbins@funtoo.org>
<console>
+
gpg: Good signature from "my_signing_key <noone@example.com>"
+
</console>
+
  
== Clone ==
+
[section target]
<console>
+
###i## git clone /tmp/backup.bundle /etc/
+
</console>
+
  
== Link world file ==
+
compression: xz
<console>
+
###i## ln /etc/world /var/lib/portage/world
+
</console>
+
  
== Emerge world ==
+
[section portage]
<console>
+
###i## emerge --sync
+
###i## layman -S
+
###i## emerge -uDaNv world
+
</console>
+
  
== Compile the kernel (genkernel)==
+
FEATURES:
If you have genkernel set to save config files (the default):
+
SYNC: $[snapshot/source/remote]
<console>
+
USE:
###i## cp /etc/kernels/kernel-config-x86_64-<latest version>-gentoo /usr/src/linux/.config
+
</console>
+
  
Otherwise use the currently loaded kernel's config:
+
[section profile]
<console>
+
###i## zcat /proc/config.gz > /usr/src/linux/.config
+
</console>
+
  
Then compile the kernel:
+
format: new
<console>
+
path: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu
###i## genkernel --oldconfig --no-mrproper all
+
arch: $[:path]/arch/$[target/arch_desc]
</console>
+
build: $[:path]/build/current
 +
flavor: $[:path]/flavor/core
 +
mix-ins:
  
== Restore grub bootloader ==
+
[section version]
<console>
+
###i## grub-install --no-floppy /dev/sda
+
###i## boot-update
+
</console>
+
  
Adjust the device as required if installing to another location.
+
python: 2.7
 +
 
 +
[section emerge]
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[section snapshot]
 +
 
 +
type: live
 +
compression: xz
 +
 
 +
[section snapshot/source]
 +
 
 +
type: git
 +
branch: funtoo.org
 +
# branch to have checked out for tarball:
 +
branch/tar: origin/master
 +
name: ports-2012
 +
remote: git://github.com/funtoo/ports-2012.git
 +
options: pull
 +
 
 +
[section metro]
 +
 
 +
options:
 +
options/stage: cache/package
 +
target: gentoo
 +
 
 +
[section baselayout]
 +
 
 +
services: sshd
 +
 
 +
[section multi]
 +
 
 +
snapshot: snapshot
 +
 
 +
[section files]
 +
 
 +
motd/trailer: [
 +
 
 +
>>> Send suggestions, improvements, bug reports relating to...
 +
 
 +
>>> This release:                  $[release/author]
 +
>>> Funtoo Linux (general):        Funtoo Linux (http://www.funtoo.org)
 +
>>> Gentoo Linux (general):        Gentoo Linux (http://www.gentoo.org)
 +
]
 +
 
 +
[collect ../../multi-targets/$[multi/mode:zap]]
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
= Building Gentoo stages =
 +
 
 +
Currently, Gentoo stages cannot be built in Metro. We have an open bug for this -- it is simply due to the fact that we focus on ensuring Funtoo Linux builds and building Gentoo is a lower priority. Historical note: Funtoo Linux originally started as a fork of Gentoo Linux so that metro could reliably build Gentoo stages.
 +
 
 +
= Advanced Features =
 +
 
 +
Metro also includes a number of advanced features that can be used to automate builds and set up distributed build servers. These features require you to {{c|emerge sqlalchemy}}, as SQLite is used as a dependency.
 +
 
 +
== Repository Management ==
 +
 
 +
Metro includes a script in the {{c|scripts}} directory called {{c|buildrepo}}. Buildrepo serves as the heart of Metro's advanced repository management features.
 +
 
 +
=== Initial Setup ===
 +
 
 +
To use {{c|buildrepo}}, you will first need to create a {{f|.buildbot}} configuration file. Here is the file I use on my AMD Jaguar build server:
 +
 
 +
{{file|name=/root/.buildbot|lang=python|body=
 +
builds = (
 +
"funtoo-current",
 +
"funtoo-current-hardened",
 +
"funtoo-stable",
 +
)
 +
 
 +
arches = (
 +
"x86-64bit",
 +
"pure64"
 +
)
 +
 
 +
subarches = (
 +
"amd64-jaguar",
 +
"amd64-jaguar-pure64",
 +
)
 +
 
 +
def map_build(build, subarch, full, full_date):
 +
# arguments refer to last build...
 +
if full == True:
 +
buildtype =  ( "freshen", )
 +
else:
 +
buildtype =  ("full", )
 +
return buildtype
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
This file is actually a python source file that defines the tuples {{c|builds}}, {{c|arches}} and {{c|subarches}}. These variables tell {{c|buildrepo}} which builds, arches and subarches it should manage. A {{c|map_build()}} function is also defined which {{c|buildbot}} uses to determine what kind of build to perform. The arguments passed to the function are based on the last successful build. The function can read these arguments and return a string to define the type of the next build. In the above example, the {{c|map_build()}} function will cause the next build after a freshen build to be a full build, and the next build after a full build to be a freshen build, so that the build will alternate between full and freshen.
  
== Reboot ==
 
<console>
 
###i## reboot
 
</console>
 
  
[[Category:First Steps]]
 
 
[[Category:HOWTO]]
 
[[Category:HOWTO]]
 +
[[Category:Metro]]
 +
__TOC__

Revision as of 19:07, February 20, 2015

Metro is the build system for Funtoo Linux and Gentoo Linux stages. It automates the bootstrapping process.

This tutorial will take you through installing, setting up and running Metro.

These other Metro documents are also available:

{{#ask: |format=ul }}

Preface

How Metro Works

Metro is the Funtoo Linux automated build system, and is used to build Funtoo Linux stage tarballs.

Metro cannot create a stage tarball out of thin air. To build a new stage tarball, Metro must use an existing, older stage tarball called a "seed" stage. This seed stage typically is used as the build environment for creating the stage we want.

Metro can use two kinds of seed stages. Traditionally, Metro has used a stage3 as a seed stage. This stage3 is then used to build a new stage1, which in turn is used to build a new stage2, and then a new stage3. This is generally the most reliable way to build Gentoo Linux or Funtoo Linux, so it's the recommended approach.

Important

After switching metro builds to Funtoo profile, Gentoo stages are no longer provided!

Seeds and Build Isolation

Another important concept to mention here is something called build isolation. Because Metro creates an isolated build environment, and the build environment is explicitly defined using existing, tangible entities -- a seed stage and a portage snapshot -- you will get consistent, repeatable results. In other words, the same seed stage, portage snapshot and build instructions will generate an essentially identical result, even if you perform the build a month later on someone else's workstation.

Local Build

Say you wanted to build a new pentium4 stage3 tarball. The recommended method of doing this would be to grab an existing pentium4 stage3 tarball to use as your seed stage. Metro will be told to use this existing pentium4 stage3 to build a new stage1 for the same pentium4. For this process, the generic pentium4 stage3 would provide the build environment for creating our new stage1. Then, the new stage1 would serve as the build environment for creating the new pentium4 stage2. And the new pentium4 stage2 would serve as the build environment for creating the new pentium4 stage3.

In the Metro terminology this is called a local build, which means a stage3 of a given architecture is used to seed a brand new build of the same architecture. Incidentally this will be the first exercise we are going to perform in this tutorial.

A week later, you may want to build a brand new pentium4 stage3 tarball. Rather than starting from the original pentium4 stage3 again, you'd probably configure Metro to use the most-recently-built pentium4 stage3 as the seed. Metro has built-in functionality to make this easy, allowing it to easily find and track the most recent stage3 seed available.

Remote Build

Metro can also perform remote build, where a stage3 of a different, but binary compatible, architecture is used as a seed to build a different architecture stage3. Consequentiality the second exercise we are going to perform in this tutorial will be to build a core2 32bit stage3 tarball from the pentium4 stage3 tarball we have just built.

TODO: add caveats about what archs can be seeded and what can be not (maybe a table?)

Tailored Build

Last, it's also worthy noting that both in local and remote builds, Metro can be configured to add and/or remove individual packages to the final tarball. Let's say you can't live without app-misc/screen, at the end of this tutorial, we will show how to have your tailored stage3 to include it.

Installing Metro

The recommended and supported method is to use the Git repository of Metro.

Ensure that Package:Git and dev-python/boto (package not on wiki - please add) (optional; required for EC2 support) are installed on your system:

# emerge dev-vcs/git
# emerge dev-python/boto

Next, clone the master git repository as follows:

# cd /root
# git clone git://github.com/funtoo/metro.git
# cp /root/metro/metro.conf ~/.metro

You will now have a directory called /root/metro that contains all the Metro source code.

Metro is now installed. It's time to customize it for your local system.

Configuring Metro

Note

Metro is not currently able to build Gentoo stages. See FL-901.

Daniel Robbins maintains Metro, so it comes pre-configured to successfully build Funtoo Linux releases. Before reading further, you might want to customize some basic settings like the number of concurrent jobs to fit your hardware's capabilities or the directory to use for produced stage archives. This is accomplished by editing ~/.metro which is the Metro's master configuration file.

Please note that path/install must point to where metro was installed. Point path/distfiles to where your distfiles reside. Also set path/mirror/owner and path/mirror/group to the owner and group of all the files that will be written to the build repository directory, which by default (as per the configuration file) is at /home/mirror/funtoo. The cache directory normally resides inside the temp directory -- this can be modified as desired. The cache directory can end up holding many cached .tbz2 packages, and eat up a lot of storage. You may want to place the temp directory on faster storage, for faster compile times, and place the cache directory on slower, but more plentiful storage.

.metro - Metro configuration
# Main metro configuration file - these settings need to be tailored to your install:

[section path]
install: /root/metro
tmp: /var/tmp/metro
cache: $[path/tmp]/cache
distfiles: /var/src/distfiles
work: $[path/tmp]/work/$[target/build]/$[target/name]

[section path/mirror]

: /home/mirror/funtoo
owner: root
group: repomgr
dirmode: 775

[section portage]

MAKEOPTS: auto 

[section emerge]

options: --jobs=4 --load-average=4 --keep-going=n

# This line should not be modified:
[collect $[path/install]/etc/master.conf]

Arch and Subarch

In the following example we are creating a pentium4 stage 3 compiled for x86-32bit binary compatibility. Pentium4 is a subarch of the x86-32bit architecture. Once you have metro installed you may find a full list of each subarch in your /root/metro/subarch directory each subarch will have the file extension .spec Example:

# ls /root/metro/subarch
# ls subarch/
amd64-bulldozer-pure64.spec  armv7a.spec          core-avx-i.spec         i686.spec         pentium.spec
amd64-bulldozer.spec         armv7a_hardfp.spec   core2_32.spec           k6-2.spec         pentium2.spec
amd64-k10-pure64.spec        athlon-4.spec        core2_64-pure64.spec    k6-3.spec         pentium3.spec
amd64-k10.spec               athlon-mp.spec       core2_64.spec           k6.spec           pentium4.spec
amd64-k8+sse3.spec           athlon-tbird.spec    corei7-pure64.spec      native_32.spec    pentiumpro.spec
amd64-k8+sse3_32.spec        athlon-xp.spec       corei7.spec             native_64.spec    prescott.spec
amd64-k8-pure64.spec         athlon.spec          generic_32.spec         niagara.spec      ultrasparc.spec
amd64-k8.spec                atom_32.spec         generic_64-pure64.spec  niagara2.spec     ultrasparc3.spec
amd64-k8_32.spec             atom_64-pure64.spec  generic_64.spec         nocona.spec       xen-pentium4+sse3.spec
armv5te.spec                 atom_64.spec         generic_sparcv9.spec    opteron_64.spec   xen-pentium4+sse3_64.spec
armv6j.spec                  btver1.spec          geode.spec              pentium-m.spec
armv6j_hardfp.spec           btver1_64.spec       i486.spec               pentium-mmx.spec

First stages build (local build)

To get this all started, we need to bootstrap the process by downloading an initial seed stage3 to use for building and place it in its proper location in /home/mirror/funtoo, so that Metro can find it. We will also need to create some special "control" files in /home/mirror/funtoo, which will allow Metro to understand how it is supposed to proceed.

Step 1: Set up pentium4 repository (local build)

Assuming we're following the basic steps outlined in the previous section, and building an unstable funtoo (funtoo-current) build for the pentium4, using a generic pentium4 stage3 as a seed stage, then here the first set of steps we'd perform:

# install -d /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4
# install -d /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/snapshots
# cd /home/metro/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4
# install -d 2011-12-13
# cd 2011-12-13
# wget -c http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4/2011-12-13/stage3-pentium4-funtoo-current-2011-12-13.tar.xz
# cd ..
# install -d .control/version
# echo "2011-12-13" > .control/version/stage3
# install -d .control/strategy
# echo local >  .control/strategy/build
# echo stage3 > .control/strategy/seed

OK, let's review the steps above. First, we create the directory /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4, which is where Metro will expect to find unstable funtoo-current pentium4 builds -- it is configured to look here by default. Then we create a specially-named directory to house our seed x86 stage3. Again, by default, Metro expects the directory to be named this way. We enter this directory, and download our seed x86 stage3 from funtoo.org. Note that the 2010-12-24 version stamp matches. Make sure that your directory name matches the stage3 name too. Everything has been set up to match Metro's default filesystem layout.

Next, we go back to the /home/mirror/metro/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4 directory, and inside it, we create a .control directory. This directory and its subdirectories contain special files that Metro references to determine certain aspects of its behavior. The .control/version/stage3 file is used by Metro to track the most recently-built stage3 for this particular build and subarch. Metro will automatically update this file with a new version stamp after it successfully builds a new stage3. But because Metro didn't actually build this stage3, we need to set up the .control/version/stage3 file manually. This will allow Metro to find our downloaded stage3 when we set up our pentium4 build to use it as a seed. Also note that Metro will create a similar .control/version/stage1 file after it successfully builds an pentium4 funtoo-current stage1.

We also set up .control/strategy/build and .control/strategy/seed files with values of local and stage3 respectively. These files define the building strategy Metro will use when we build pentium4 funtoo-current stages. With a build strategy of local, Metro will source its seed stage from funtoo-current pentium4, the current directory. And with a seed strategy of stage3, Metro will use a stage3 as a seed, and use this seed to build a new stage1, stage2 and stage3.

Step 2: Building the pentium4 stages

Incidentally, if all you wanted to do at this point was to build a new pentium4 funtoo-current stage1/2/3 (plus openvz and vserver templates). You would begin the process by typing:

# cd /root/metro
# scripts/ezbuild.sh funtoo-current pentium4

If you have a slow machine, it could take several hours to be completed because several "heavy" components like gcc or glibc have to be recompiled in each stage. Once a stage has been successfully completed, it is placed in the "${METRO_MIRROR}/funtoo-current/x32-bit/pentium4/YYYY-MM-DD" subdirectory, where YYYY-MM-DD is today's date at the time the ezbuild.sh script was started or the date you put on the ezscript.sh command line.

Building for another binary compatible architecture (remote build)

As written above, Metro is able to perform remote build building different architecture stage3 from a binary compatible seeding stage3 (e.g. using a pentium4 stage3 to seed a Intel Core2 32bits stage3).

In the Metro terminology this is called a remote build (a stage 3 of a different, but binary compatible, architecture is used as a seed). What's not compatible? You can't use a Sparc architecture to generate an x86 or ARM based stage and vice-versa. If you use a 32bit stage then you don't want to seed a 64bit build from it. Be sure that you are using a stage from the same architecture that you are trying to seed. Check Funtoo-current FTP Mirror for a stage that is from the same Architecture that you will be building.

Note

Often, one build (ie. funtoo-current) can be used as a seed for another build such as funtoo-stable. However, hardened builds require hardened stages as seeds in order for the build to complete successfully.

Step 1: Set up Core_2 32bit repository

In this example, we're going to use this pentium4 funtoo-current stage3 to seed a new Core_2 32bit funtoo-current build. To get that done, we need to set up the pentium4 build directory as follows:

#  cd /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit
# install -d core2_32
# cd core2_32
# install -d .control/strategy
# echo remote > .control/strategy/build
# echo stage3 > .control/strategy/seed
# install -d .control/remote
# echo funtoo-current > .control/remote/build
# echo x86-32bit > .control/remote/arch_desc
# echo pentium4 > .control/remote/subarch

The steps we follow are similar to those we performed for a local build to set up our pentium4 directory for local build. However, note the differences. We didn't download a stage, because we are going to use the pentium4 stage to build a new Core_2 32bit stage. We also didn't create the .control/version/stage{1,3} files because Metro will create them for us after it successfully builds a new stage1 and stage3. We are still using a stage3 seed strategy, but we've set the build strategy to remote, which means that we're going to use a seed stage that's not from this particular subdirectory. Where are we going to get it from? The .control/remote directory contains this information, and lets Metro know that it should look for its seed stage3 in the /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4 directory. Which one will it grab? You guessed it -- the most recently built stage3 (since our seed strategy was set to stage3) that has the version stamp of 2010-12-24, as recorded in /home/mirror/funtoo-current/x86-32bit/pentium4/.control/version/stage. Now you can see how all those control files come together to direct Metro to do the right thing.

Note

arch_desc should be set to one of: x86-32bit, x86-64bit or pure64 for PC-compatible systems. You must use a 32-bit build as a seed for other 32-bit builds, and a 64-bit build as a seed for other 64-bit builds.

Step 2: Building the Core_2 32bit stages

Now, you could start building your new Core_2 32bit stage1/2/3 (plus openvz and vserver templates) by typing the following:

# /root/metro/scripts/ezbuild.sh funtoo-current core2_32

In that case, the produced stages are placed in the /home/mirror/funtoo/funtoo-current/x32-bit/core2_32/YYYY-MM-DD subdirectory.

Step 3: The Next Build

At this point, you now have a new Core_2 32bit stage3, built using a "remote" pentium4 stage3. Once the first remote build completes successfully, metro will automatically change .control/strategy/build to be local instead of remote, so it will use the most recently-built Core_2 32bit stage3 as a seed for any new Core_2 32bit builds from now on.

Build your own tailored stage3

Metro can be easily configured for building custom stage3 by including additional packages. Edit the following configuration file /root/metro/etc/builds/funtoo-current/build.conf:

funtoo-current/build.conf
[collect ../../fslayouts/funtoo/layout.conf]

[section release]

author: Daniel Robbins <drobbins@funtoo.org>

[section target]

compression: xz

[section portage]

FEATURES: 
SYNC: $[snapshot/source/remote]
USE:

[section profile]

format: new
path: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu
arch: $[:path]/arch/$[target/arch_desc]
build: $[:path]/build/current
flavor: $[:path]/flavor/core
mix-ins:

[section version]

python: 2.7

[section emerge]


[section snapshot]

type: live
compression: xz

[section snapshot/source]

type: git
branch: funtoo.org
# branch to have checked out for tarball:
branch/tar: origin/master
name: ports-2012 
remote: git://github.com/funtoo/ports-2012.git
options: pull

[section metro]

options: 
options/stage: cache/package
target: gentoo

[section baselayout]

services: sshd

[section multi]

snapshot: snapshot

[section files]

motd/trailer: [

 >>> Send suggestions, improvements, bug reports relating to...

 >>> This release:                  $[release/author]
 >>> Funtoo Linux (general):        Funtoo Linux (http://www.funtoo.org)
 >>> Gentoo Linux (general):        Gentoo Linux (http://www.gentoo.org)
]

[collect ../../multi-targets/$[multi/mode:zap]]

Building Gentoo stages

Currently, Gentoo stages cannot be built in Metro. We have an open bug for this -- it is simply due to the fact that we focus on ensuring Funtoo Linux builds and building Gentoo is a lower priority. Historical note: Funtoo Linux originally started as a fork of Gentoo Linux so that metro could reliably build Gentoo stages.

Advanced Features

Metro also includes a number of advanced features that can be used to automate builds and set up distributed build servers. These features require you to emerge sqlalchemy, as SQLite is used as a dependency.

Repository Management

Metro includes a script in the scripts directory called buildrepo. Buildrepo serves as the heart of Metro's advanced repository management features.

Initial Setup

To use buildrepo, you will first need to create a .buildbot configuration file. Here is the file I use on my AMD Jaguar build server:

/root/.buildbot (python source code)
builds = (
	"funtoo-current",
	"funtoo-current-hardened",
	"funtoo-stable",
)
 
arches = (
	"x86-64bit",
	"pure64"
)
 
subarches = (
	"amd64-jaguar",
	"amd64-jaguar-pure64",
)
 
def map_build(build, subarch, full, full_date):
	# arguments refer to last build...
	if full == True:
		buildtype =  ( "freshen", )
	else:
		buildtype =  ("full", )
	return buildtype

This file is actually a python source file that defines the tuples builds, arches and subarches. These variables tell buildrepo which builds, arches and subarches it should manage. A map_build() function is also defined which buildbot uses to determine what kind of build to perform. The arguments passed to the function are based on the last successful build. The function can read these arguments and return a string to define the type of the next build. In the above example, the map_build() function will cause the next build after a freshen build to be a full build, and the next build after a full build to be a freshen build, so that the build will alternate between full and freshen.