Difference between pages "Help:Funtoo Editing Guidelines" and "Zope HOWTO"

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m (Updated some of the syntax on the page.)
 
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'''Thanks for your interest in contributing to the the Funtoo wiki!'''
+
This page documents how to use Zope with Funtoo Experimental, which currently has good Zope support thanks to [[Progress Overlay Python]] integration.
__NOTOC__
+
== Types of Edits ==
+
  
Before we get started, let's review what changes are okay to make, and what changes are not okay:
+
== About Zope ==
  
{{TableStart}}
+
Zope is an Open Source application server framework written in Python. It has an interesting history which you should familiarize yourself with before starting Zope development, as it contains several interesting twists and turns.
<tr class="active"><th>Type of Change</th><th>Okay?</th></tr>
+
<tr><td>Grammar/spelling fixes</td><td>Yes</td></tr>
+
<tr><td>New wiki content</td><td>Yes</td></tr>
+
<tr><td>New package information</td><td>Yes</td></tr>
+
<tr><td>Adding to existing article</td><td>Maybe -- see below</td></tr>
+
<tr><td>Adding missing/incomplete information</td><td>Yes</td></tr>
+
<tr><td>Making corrections</td><td>Yes</td></tr>
+
<tr class="danger"><td>Adding work-arounds to problems experienced</td><td>No - open bug first on [http://bugs.funtoo.org bug tracker].</td></tr>
+
{{TableEnd}}
+
  
{{important|Note that if you experience some problem with Funtoo Linux, during installation or otherwise, the proper course of action is to not add a work-around to our documentation, but to ''open a bug on our bug tracker.'' This is important because the problem you experienced may be a legitimate bug and the solution may be to fix the bug rather than add a work-around to our documentation. We may end up fixing a bug, making a documentation fix, or possibly both.}}
+
=== Zope History ===
  
== Basics ==
+
{{Note|This HOWTO targets Zope 2.13, which includes Five. It is typically the version you should be using for new Zope projects.}}
  
Here is a list of basic wiki information that you will need to know to get started:
+
* There are two versions of Zope: Zope 2 and Zope 3. One might assume that Zope 3 is the version that people should use for new software development projects by default, but this is not the case. Most Zope-based projects continue to use Zope 2. Zope 3 was an attempt to redesign Zope 2 from scratch, and is completely different from Zope 2, but it was not adopted by the community.
  
* First, to perform edits on the wiki, you must {{CreateAccount}} and log in.
+
* There is also something called [http://codespeak.net/z3/five/ Five] (named because it is "2 + 3") that backports many of the new features of Zope 3 into the Zope 2 framework. Several projects will use Zope 2 plus Five in order to use some of the newer features in Zope. Five was merged into mainline Zope 2 in early 2010, and first appeared in Zope 2.8.
* You can create a new page by navigating to http://www.funtoo.org/New_Page_Name. Underscores are the equivalent of spaces. Then select "Create" under the "Actions" menu.
+
* Whether creating a new page or editing an existing page by clicking "Edit", you will be presented with Web-based text editor that allows you to modify the ''wikitext'' of the page. The wikitext is rendered to produce the document you see when you view the page normally.
+
* This wiki uses the [http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:Approved_Revs ApprovedRevs Extension], which means that any changes you make to a page will need to be approved by an Editor before they are displayed. Editors can visit the [[Special:ApprovedRevs]] page to approve edits made on pages (click "Pages whose approved revision is not their latest" or "Unapproved pages".)
+
* Until your edits are approved, you can continue to edit the page and your changes will be displayed in the page's History -- click "History" under the "Actions" menu to view the page's history. You will see that the approved version of a page has a star next to it.
+
* Another fun thing you can do is click on your name under the "Account" menu once you have logged in. This will bring you to your "User" page. Then click "Create with Form" unde the "Actions" menu and enter your geographic and other information. This will allow you to be displayed on our [[Usermap]] and will also allow your full name to be displayed on [[:Category:Ebuilds|Ebuild pages]] for which you are an author. It's generally a good idea to do this.
+
  
{{tip|The following sections document how to use wikitext and Funtoo templates on the Funtoo wiki.}}
+
* You can learn more about the history of Zope 2, 3 and Five in the [http://svn.zope.org/Zope/trunk/src/Products/Five/README.txt?view=markup Five README].
  
== Paragraphs ==
+
* To make things even more interesting, work on [http://docs.zope.org/zope2/releases/4.0/ Zope 4] is underway, and it will be based on 2.13 rather than 3.x. It includes a number of [http://docs.zope.org/zope2/releases/4.0/CHANGES.html#restructuring incompatible changes] with prior versions.
 +
=== Zope Resources ===
  
To create a new paragraph, insert a blank line between two lines of text. If a blank line doesn't exist between two lines of wikitext, they will be combined into a single flowing paragraph.
+
Now that you understand what version of Zope you should be targeting (2.13), we can point you towards the correct documentation :)
  
If you leave leading whitespace at the beginning of a line, MediaWiki will render it as pre-formatted text. Beware of this. Here's an example:
+
; '''[http://docs.zope.org/zope2/zope2book/ The Zope 2 Book]'''
 +
: This book provides a general introduction to Zope concepts and ZMI. It is a good place to start, but doesn't provide a direct introduction to Zope development. It's recommended that you skim through this book to familiarize yourself with Zope. It generally does not assume much prior knowledge about Web development or Python.
 +
; '''[http://docs.zope.org/zope2/zdgbook/ Zope Developer's Guide]'''
 +
: This guide will give you a better introduction to Zope development. It assumes you already know Python. Skip chapters 1 and 2 and start in [http://docs.zope.org/zope2/zdgbook/ComponentsAndInterfaces.html chapter 3], which covers components and interfaces. [http://docs.zope.org/zope2/zdgbook/Products.html Chapter 5] covers the creation of your first product.
 +
; '''[http://codespeak.net/z3/five/manual.html The Five Manual]'''
 +
: We're not done yet. There is a bunch of stuff in Zope 2.13 that is not in the official documentation. Namely, the stuff in Five.
 +
; '''[http://docs.zope.org/ztkpackages.html ZTK Documentation]'''
 +
: ZTK 
 +
; '''ZCA'''
 +
: [http://www.muthukadan.net/docs/zca.html A Comprehensive Guide to Zope Component Architecture] offers a good introduction to the programming concepts of ZCA. We also have a new page on [[Zope Component Architecture]] which will help you to understand the big picture of ZCA and why it is useful. ZCML ("Z-camel") is a part of ZCA and  was introduced in Zope 3, so typically you will find ZCML documented within Zope 3 documentation and book.
 +
; '''Content Components'''
 +
: Views and Viewlets: [http://docs.zope.org/zope.viewlet/index.html This tutorial on viewlets] also contains some viewlet-related ZCML examples near the end. The "Content Component way" of developing in Zope seems to be a Zope 3 thing and tied to ZCML. Chapter 13+ of Stephan Richter's ''Zope 3 Developer's Handbook'' (book) seems to cover this quite well. You will probably also want to check out Philipp Weitershausen's ''Web Component Development with Zope 3'' (book).
 +
; '''[http://wiki.zope.org/zope2/Zope2Wiki Zope 2 Wiki]'''
 +
: Main wiki page for all things related to Zope 2.
 +
; '''[http://docs.zope.org docs.zope.org]'''
 +
: This is the main site for Zope documentation.
  
foobar
+
== First Steps ==
  
This can rear its ugly head when specifying template parameters, so you will get this:
+
First, you will need to emerge {{Package|net-zope/zope}}:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
###i## emerge zope
 +
}}
 +
Zope is now installed.
  
{{note| ugh!}}
+
== Project Skeleton ==
  
...instead of this:
+
{{Note|Zope should be run by a regular user account, not as the root user.}}
  
{{note|This looks much better!}}
+
The first step in using Zope is to ensure that you are using a regular user account. As a regular user, create a new directory called {{c|zope_test}}:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
$##bl## cd
 +
$##bl## mkdir zope_test
 +
}}
 +
Now, enter the directory, and create an "instance", which is a set of files and directories that are used to contain a Zope project:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
$##bl## cd zope_test
 +
$##bl## /usr/lib/zope-2.13/bin/mkzopeinstance
 +
}}
 +
You will see the following output and will be prompted to answer a few questions:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
Please choose a directory in which you'd like to install
 +
Zope "instance home" files such as database files, configuration
 +
files, etc.
  
== Page and Section Capitalization ==
+
Directory: instance
 +
Please choose a username and password for the initial user.
 +
These will be the credentials you use to initially manage
 +
your new Zope instance.
  
In general, capitalize all words in page names and section heading except:
+
Username: admin
* Articles: a, an, the
+
Password: ****
* Coordinating Conjunctions: and, but, or, for, nor, etc.
+
Verify password: ****
* Prepositions (fewer than five letters): on, at, to, from, by, etc.
+
}}
 +
Now, we will start our Zope instance:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
$##bl## cd instance
 +
$##bl## bin/runzope
 +
}}
 +
Now that Zope is functional, you can go to the {{c|localhost:8080/manage}} URL in your web browser: you will be prompted to log in. Enter the username and password you specified. You are now logged in to the ZMI (Zope Management Interface.)
  
== Document Hierarchy ==
+
You can stop your application by pressing Control-C. In the future, you can start and stop your Zope instance using the following commands:
 +
{{console|body=
 +
$##bl## zopectl start
 +
$##bl## zopectl stop
 +
}}
 +
{{Note|{{c|zopectl start}} will cause your instance to run in the background rather than consuming a shell console.}}
  
Use section headings to create a document hierarchy for your page. These will define the table of contents that appears at the top of the wiki page. Create chapters, sections and sub-sections as follows:
+
== First Project ==
  
<pre>= Page Title =
+
We will create a single, very primitive Zope package, consisting of an Interface for a TODO class, and a TODO class.
  
== Chapter Title ==
+
Create the following files and directories relative to your project root:
  
=== Section Title ===
+
* Create the directory {{c|lib/python/example}}.
 +
* Create the file {{c|lib/python/example/__init__.py}} by typing {{c|touch lib/python/example/__init__.py}}.
 +
* Create these files:
  
==== SubSection Title ====
+
=== {{c|example-configure.zcml}} ===
  
</pre>
+
This file registers the {{c|example}} directory you created in {{c|lib/python}} as a ''package'', so that it is seen by Zope. Edit {{c|/etc/package-includes/example-configure.zcml}}:
 +
{{file|name=/etc/package-includes/example-configure.zcml|body=
 +
<include package="example" />
 +
}}
  
== Links ==
+
=== {{c|interfaces.py}} ===
  
Internal links to other wiki pages can be specified as <tt><nowiki>[[pagename]]</nowiki></tt>. To specify an alternate name for the link, use <tt><nowiki>[[pagename|my link name]]</nowiki></tt>.
+
The following file defines the <tt>ITODO</tt> interface, and also uses some Zope Schema functions to define what kind of data we expect to store in objects that implement <tt>ITODO</tt>. Edit <code>/lib/python/example/interfaces.py</code> with your favorite text editor:
  
For external links, use <tt><nowiki>[http://funtoo.org my link]</nowiki></tt> to specify a URL. If you want the URL to appear in the wikitext, you can specify it without brackets: http://forums.funtoo.org.
 
 
== Lists ==
 
 
MediaWiki supports a number of list formats:
 
 
* Unordered List
 
* Unordered Item 2
 
** Unordered sub-item
 
 
# Ordered List
 
# Ordered Item 2
 
## Ordered sub-item
 
 
;Term: This is called a "definition list". It is used when defining various terms.
 
 
If you need to quote a portion of text from another site, use <tt><nowiki><blockquote></nowiki></tt> as follows:
 
 
<blockquote>
 
Wikipedia (ˌwɪkɨˈpiːdiə/ or wɪkiˈpiːdiə/ wik-i-pee-dee-ə) is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access, free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Volunteers worldwide collaboratively write Wikipedia's 30 million articles in 287 languages, including over 4.5 million in the English Wikipedia. Anyone who can access the site can edit almost any of its articles, which on the Internet comprise[4] the largest and most popular general reference work.[5][6][7][8][9] In February 2014, The New York Times reported that Wikipedia is ranked fifth globally among all websites stating, "With 18 billion page views and nearly 500 million unique visitors a month..., Wikipedia trails just Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft and Google, the largest with 1.2 billion unique visitors."[10]
 
</blockquote>
 
 
== Literal Text and HTML Symbols ==
 
 
Here is wikitext for the section above, which I am displaying by placing the literal wikitext between a &#60;pre&#62; and &#60;/pre&#62; tag. If you want to disable wikitext processing for an inline span of text, use &#60;nowiki&#62; and &#60;/nowiki&#62;. If you want to print out a tag literally, use &amp;#60; and &amp;#62; (In the wikitext, I used &amp;amp;#60; and &amp;amp;#62 to display these!)
 
 
<pre>
 
* Unordered List
 
* Unordered Item 2
 
** Unordered sub-item
 
 
# Ordered List
 
# Ordered Item 2
 
## Ordered sub-item
 
 
;Term: This is called a "definition list". It is used when defining various terms.
 
 
If you need to quote a portion of text from another site, use <tt><nowiki><blockquote></nowiki></tt> as follows:
 
 
<blockquote>
 
Wikipedia (ˌwɪkɨˈpiːdiə/ or wɪkiˈpiːdiə/ wik-i-pee-dee-ə) is a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free-access,
 
free content Internet encyclopedia that is supported and hosted by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Volunteers
 
worldwide collaboratively write Wikipedia's 30 million articles in 287 languages, including over 4.5 million in the
 
English Wikipedia. Anyone who can access the site can edit almost any of its articles, which on the Internet
 
comprise[4] the largest and most popular general reference work.[5][6][7][8][9] In February 2014, The New York
 
Times reported that Wikipedia is ranked fifth globally among all websites stating, "With 18 billion page views
 
and nearly 500 million unique visitors a month..., Wikipedia trails just Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft and Google,
 
the largest with 1.2 billion unique visitors."[10]
 
</blockquote>
 
</pre>
 
 
== Linking to Packages ==
 
 
To link to a package page, use the <code>Package</code> template:
 
 
<pre><nowiki>
 
{{Package|sys-apps/portage}}
 
</nowiki></pre>
 
 
This template will create a link to the official wiki page for sys-apps/portage, and render using the official "English" page name, as follows:
 
 
{{Package|sys-apps/portage}}
 
 
If you specify a yet-to-be-documented ebuild, it will render like this (which is okay -- it will encourage people to document it):
 
 
{{Package|sys-foo/undocumented-ebuild}}
 
 
== Tables ==
 
 
Instead of using traditional MediaWiki table wikitext, use the following format:
 
 
<pre>
 
{{TableStart}}
 
<tr class="info"><th>Header 1</th><th>Header 2</th></tr>
 
<tr><td>Value 1</td><td>Value 2</td></tr>
 
<tr><td>Value 3</td><td>Value 4</td></tr>
 
{{TableEnd}}
 
</pre>
 
 
This wil render as follows:
 
 
{{TableStart}}
 
<tr class="info"><th>Header 1</th><th>Header 2</th></tr>
 
<tr><td>Value 1</td><td>Value 2</td></tr>
 
<tr><td>Value 3</td><td>Value 4</td></tr>
 
{{TableEnd}}
 
 
{{tip|This table syntax has an added benefit of creating a responsive table that renders properly on mobile devices.}}
 
 
It is possible to use the following CSS classes with <code>tr</code> (rows) and <code>td/th</code> elements to color them as desired:
 
 
{{TableStart}}
 
<tr class="active"><td>Class Name</td></tr>
 
<tr class="success"><td>success</td></tr>
 
<tr class="info"><td>info</td></tr>
 
<tr class="warning"><td>warning</td></tr>
 
<tr class="active"><td>active</td></tr>
 
<tr class="danger"><td>danger</td></tr>
 
{{TableEnd}}
 
 
== Displaying Source Code ==
 
 
To display source code, use the <tt>&#60;syntaxhighlight&#62;</tt> tag, which has the ability to perform syntax highlighting on the source code for easier reading:
 
<pre>
 
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="python">
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="python">
import system
+
from zope.interface import Interface
</syntaxhighlight>
+
from zope.schema import List, Text, TextLine, Int
</pre>
+
  
This will produce the following output:
+
class ITODO(Interface):
 
+
    name = TextLine(title=u'Name', required=True)
<syntaxhighlight lang="python">
+
    todo = List(title=u"TODO Items", required=True, value_type=TextLine(title=u'TODO'))
import system
+
    daysleft = Int(title=u'Days left to complete', required=True)
 +
    description = Text(title=u'Description', required=True)
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
  
Alternatively, if you need a caption, use can use the file template, specifying a <tt>lang=</tt> parameter:
+
=== {{c|TODO.py}} ===
  
<pre>
+
Now, we define {{c|TODO}} to be a ''persistent'' object, meaning it can be stored in the ZODB. We specify that it implements our previously-defined {{c|ITODO}} interface, and provide reasonable defaults for all values when we create a new TODO object. Edit {{c|/lib/python/example/TODO.py}} using your favorite text editor:
{{file|name=foobar|lang=python|desc=foobarosity|body=
+
{{file|name=/lib/python/example/TODO.py|lang=python|body=
import system
+
from persistent import Persistent
}}
+
from zope.interface import implements
</pre>
+
from example.interfaces import ITODO
 
+
This will produce:
+
  
{{file|name=foobar|lang=python|desc=foobarosity|body=
+
class TODO(Persistent):
import system
+
    implements(ITODO)
 +
    name = u''
 +
    todo = []
 +
    daysleft = 0
 +
    description = u''
 
}}
 
}}
  
{{important|If you need to display the pipe ("{{!}}") character within the body of a file template, replace each "{{!}}" with <nowiki>{{!}}</nowiki> -- otherwise your file contents will not display properly. This is necessary because <nowiki>{{file}}</nowiki> is a template and the "{{!}}" character is used as a delimiter for arguments to the template.}}
+
=== {{c|configure.zcml}} ===
  
Note that the language should be specified in the <tt>lang</tt> attribute. For a list of supported languages, see [http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:SyntaxHighlight_GeSHi#Supported_languages this list].
+
Create the <tt>/lib/python/example/configure.zcml</tt> configuration file:
 
+
<syntaxhighlight lang="xml">
== Displaying Text File Contents ==
+
<configure xmlns="http://namespaces.zope.org/zope"
 
+
    xmlns:five="http://namespaces.zope.org/five"
For displaying the contents of non-programming language text files (like config files), you have two options. You can enclose your lines within <tt>&#60;pre&#62;</tt> tags, or use the new [[Template:File|file template]]. The file template is used like so:
+
    xmlns:browser="http://namespaces.zope.org/browser">
 
+
</configure>
<pre>
+
</syntaxhighlight>
{{file|name=/etc/foo.conf|desc=My foo.conf file|body=
+
# /etc/host.conf:
+
# $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/src/patchsets/glibc/extra/etc/host.conf,v 1.1 2006/09/29
+
}}
+
</pre>
+
 
+
This will produce:
+
 
+
{{file|name=/etc/foo.conf|desc=My foo.conf file|body=
+
# /etc/host.conf:
+
# $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/src/patchsets/glibc/extra/etc/host.conf,v 1.1 2006/09/29
+
}}
+
  
== Console ==
+
== Debug Mode ==
To display console output, use the <tt>&#60;console&#62;</tt> tag:
+
  
For a root console:
+
We can test our first project by entering debug mode:
<pre>
+
 
<console>
 
<console>
###i## run a command as root
+
$##i## bin/zopectl debug
</console>
+
Starting debugger (the name "app" is bound to the top-level Zope object)
</pre>
+
Produces:
+
<console>
+
###i## run a command as root
+
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
For a non-root console:
+
Now, let's try creating a new TODO object and writing it out to a ZODB database:
<pre>
+
 
<console>
 
<console>
$ ##i##run a command as user
+
>>> from ZODB import FileStorage, DB
 +
>>> storage = FileStorage.FileStorage('mydatabase.fs')
 +
>>> db = DB(storage)
 +
>>> connection = db.open()
 +
>>> import transaction
 +
>>> root = connection.root()
 +
>>> from example.TODO import TODO
 +
>>> a = TODO
 +
>>> a.name = u'My TODOs'
 +
>>> a.TODOS = [ u'Do Laundry', u'Wash Dishes' ]
 +
>>> a.daysleft = 1
 +
>>> a.description = u'Things I need to do today.'
 +
>>> root[u'today'] = a
 +
>>> transaction.commit()
 
</console>
 
</console>
</pre>
 
Produces:
 
<console>
 
$ ##i##run a command as user
 
</console>
 
 
{{important|1=
 
Note that we use a <tt>#</tt> prompt for <tt>root</tt> and a <tt>$</tt> prompt to denote a non-root user.}}
 
 
{{important|The <tt>##i##</tt> text tags the rest of the line as being ''user input'' ("i" is for "input"). It is then highlighted in a noticeable color so it stands out from text that is not typed in by the user.}}
 
 
If you need to end highlighting of user input prior to the end of a line, use <code>##!i##</code> to mark the end of the highlighted area.
 
 
The following special character sequences are also available:
 
* <code>##g##</code> - Green
 
* <code>##y##</code> - Yellow
 
* <code>##bl##</code> - Blue
 
* <code>##r##</code> - Red
 
* <code>##b##</code> - Bold
 
 
Please use the above coloring options sparingly. It is sometimes nice to use them to get wiki console output to match the colors that are displayed on a Linux console. Also note that for every color above, there is a matching <code>##!(colorcode)##</code> option to turn color off prior to end of line.
 
 
Here is an example of its use:<console>
 
# ##i##bluetoothctl
 
[##g##NEW##!g##] Controller 00:02:72:C9:62:65 antec [default]
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl###power on
 
Changing power on succeeded
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##agent on
 
Agent registered
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##scan on
 
Discovery started
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##devices
 
Device 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75 Logitech K760
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##pair 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75
 
Attempting to pair with 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75
 
[##y##CHG##!y##] Device 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75 Connected: yes
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: 454358
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##4##!i##54358
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##45##!i##4358
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##454##!i##358
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##4543##!i##58
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##45435##!i##8
 
##r##[agent]##!r## Passkey: ##i##454358##!i##
 
[##y##CHG##!y##] Device 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75 Paired: yes
 
Pairing successful
 
[##y##CHG##!y##] Device 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75 Connected: no
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##connect 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75
 
Attempting to connect to 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75
 
[##y##CHG##!y##] Device 00:1F:20:3D:1E:75 Connected: yes
 
Connection successful
 
##bl##[bluetooth]##!bl### ##i##quit
 
[##r##DEL##!r##] Controller 00:02:72:C9:62:65 antec [default]
 
#
 
</console>
 
 
== Informational Messages ==
 
Notes, warnings, tips, and important templates can be used for informational messages that need to be offset from the regular text flow:
 
 
<pre>{{note|this is a note}}</pre>
 
{{note|this is a note}}
 
 
<pre>{{important|this is important}}</pre>
 
{{important|this is important}}
 
 
<pre>{{warning|this is a warning}}</pre>
 
{{warning|this is a warning}}
 
 
<pre>{{tip|this is a tip}}</pre>
 
{{tip|this is a tip}}
 
 
Note that these templates used to be called <code>fancynote</code>, <code>fancytip</code>, etc. The "fancy" names have been deprecated but will still be supported for the forseeable future.
 
 
== Kernelop ==
 
To display kernel configuration options, we encourage you to use the <tt>kernelop</tt> template. To use the <tt>kernelop</tt> template, create an entry similar to the following example:
 
<pre>
 
{{kernelop|title=foo,bar|desc=
 
kernel options pasted from "make menuconfig"
 
}}
 
</pre>
 
 
{{note|Kernelop is colored blue to slightly resemble the blueish background from <tt>make menuconfig</tt>.}}
 
 
Adding this entry will give you the following output:
 
{{kernelop|title=foo,bar|desc=
 
kernel options
 
}}
 
 
Here's a more concrete example:
 
{{kernelop|title=File systems|desc=
 
<M> Second extended fs support         
 
[ ]  Ext2 extended attributes         
 
[ ]  Ext2 execute in place support   
 
<M> Ext3 journalling file system support
 
}}
 
 
Examples of usage:
 
* [[Package:AMD Catalyst Video Drivers]]
 
* [[Package:ACPI Daemon]]
 
* [[Microcode]]
 
 
== Discussion Pages ==
 
 
In MediaWiki, every "regular" wiki page has a corresponding "Talk" or "Discussion" page which has a page name prefixed by "Talk:" -- you can get to this page by going to the "Action" menu, and then choosing the "Discussion" menu item. These talk pages are typically used to discuss the edits that are going on in the "main" wiki page. The problem with talk pages is that they are kind of a pain to use. However, we have a way to fix that. If you want to enable a DISQUS-based mini-forum on a talk page, insert the following wikitext on the Talk page:
 
 
<pre>
 
{{DISQUS}}
 
</pre>
 
 
...and presto! You will now have DISQUS-powered mini-forums to discuss whatever you want about your wiki page.
 
 
== Marking Pages as Needing Updates ==
 
 
If you find outdated wiki content, but you don't have the time or ability to update it, add one of the following templates to the wikitext of the page. This will add the page to the [[:Category:Needs Updates|Needs Updates Category]] so we can identify pages that need updating:
 
 
<pre>
 
{{PageNeedsUpdates}}
 
{{SectionNeedsUpdates}}
 
</pre>
 
 
 
Examples of usage:
 
* [[UEFI Install Guide]]
 
* [[Package:MediaWiki]]
 
* [[Clang]]
 
 
== Inline Code ==
 
 
To emphasize filenames, commands, and other technical jargon when they appear inline in a paragraph, use the <tt>&#60;code&#62;</tt> element. Follow the example below:
 
 
<pre>
 
The <code>/etc/fstab</code> file is an important one. Another important file is <code>/boot/grub/grub.cfg</code>.
 
</pre>
 
 
This example produces the following output:
 
 
The <code>/etc/fstab</code> file is an important one. Another important file is <code>/boot/grub/grub.cfg</code>.
 
 
{{important|1=
 
The &#60;tt&#62; tag has been deprecated for the purpose of tagging inline code, to conform with HTML5.}}
 
 
== Slideshow ==
 
 
Any page has the capability of displaying a slideshow. Adding a slideshow to a page involves three steps:
 
 
# Upload Images
 
# Define Slides
 
# Add Slideshow to page
 
 
=== Upload Images ===
 
 
To upload images, head to [[Special:Upload]] and upload a file. It is highly recommended to upload JPEG format images in high resolution -- MediaWiki will handle scaling JPEG automatically, saving bandwidth, but does not do this for PNG. Make sure that all images you upload have the same dimensions. When you upload, make note of the '''Destination Filename''' field -- this is the name that the upload will use when you reference it in your slide. It is recommended that you choose a simple descriptive name ending in ".jpg" for the '''Destination Filename'''.
 
 
=== Define Slides ===
 
 
Once images have been uploaded, you must define slides. To define slides on a page, you enter special semantic information about the slide on the page that it will be displayed, in the following format:
 
 
<pre><nowiki>
 
{{#subobject:|slideIndex=0|slideCaption=
 
== Wikitext Here ==
 
This is a fantastic slide!
 
|slideImage=File:Fruit.jpg|slideLink=PageName}}
 
</nowiki></pre>
 
 
Here are some important instructions regarding defining slides:
 
 
* <code>slideIndex</code> must be 0 for the first slide, 1 for the second slide, etc. Numbers must be unique and incrementing from zero, and not doing this will result in slideshow display errors (but can be easily fixed by correcting the wikitext.)
 
* <code>slideCaption=</code> can contain wikitext, such as headings and links. The best way to enter <code>slideCaption</code> is as above -- type a literal <code>slideCaption=</code>, followed by enter, then specify your wikitext, and terminate the caption by a single pipe character on the following line. Pipe characters are used to separate arguments from each other.
 
* Specify your image name in the <code>slideImage</code> field. Your slideImage will have a name of <code>File:myname.jpg</code>, where <code>myname.jpg</code> is the '''Destination Filename''' you used when uploading the image.
 
* An optional parameter called <code>slideLink=</code> can be provided to allow the image to be clickable and link to another wiki page. If it is omitted, then the image will not be clickable.
 
 
=== Add Slideshow to Page ===
 
 
Once the slides have been added to the page, you can add the following text to your page at the point you'd like the slideshow to appear:
 
<pre>
 
{{Slideshow}}
 
</pre>
 
 
== YouTube Videos (Screencasts, etc.) ==
 
 
Screencasting is an easy method to explain complex tasks. Take for instance <code>youtu.be/5KDei5mBfSg</code> and chop off the id and insert it into the following syntax to produce a video example.
 
 
<pre>{{#widget:YouTube16x9|id=5KDei5mBfSg}}</pre>
 
{{#widget:YouTube16x9|id=5KDei5mBfSg}}
 
 
{{tip|The sample video above explains how to create your own screencasts under Funtoo Linux.}}
 
 
Most YouTube videos are in 16x9 format and should use the <code>YouTube16x9</code> widget. There is also a <code>YouTube4x3</code> widget for videos with a 4x3 aspect ratio.
 
{{note|These YouTube widgets have been updated to be mobile-friendly.}}
 
  
[[Category:Wiki Development]]
+
[[Category:HOWTO]]

Latest revision as of 17:32, June 25, 2015

This page documents how to use Zope with Funtoo Experimental, which currently has good Zope support thanks to Progress Overlay Python integration.

About Zope

Zope is an Open Source application server framework written in Python. It has an interesting history which you should familiarize yourself with before starting Zope development, as it contains several interesting twists and turns.

Zope History

Note

This HOWTO targets Zope 2.13, which includes Five. It is typically the version you should be using for new Zope projects.

  • There are two versions of Zope: Zope 2 and Zope 3. One might assume that Zope 3 is the version that people should use for new software development projects by default, but this is not the case. Most Zope-based projects continue to use Zope 2. Zope 3 was an attempt to redesign Zope 2 from scratch, and is completely different from Zope 2, but it was not adopted by the community.
  • There is also something called Five (named because it is "2 + 3") that backports many of the new features of Zope 3 into the Zope 2 framework. Several projects will use Zope 2 plus Five in order to use some of the newer features in Zope. Five was merged into mainline Zope 2 in early 2010, and first appeared in Zope 2.8.
  • You can learn more about the history of Zope 2, 3 and Five in the Five README.
  • To make things even more interesting, work on Zope 4 is underway, and it will be based on 2.13 rather than 3.x. It includes a number of incompatible changes with prior versions.

Zope Resources

Now that you understand what version of Zope you should be targeting (2.13), we can point you towards the correct documentation :)

The Zope 2 Book
This book provides a general introduction to Zope concepts and ZMI. It is a good place to start, but doesn't provide a direct introduction to Zope development. It's recommended that you skim through this book to familiarize yourself with Zope. It generally does not assume much prior knowledge about Web development or Python.
Zope Developer's Guide
This guide will give you a better introduction to Zope development. It assumes you already know Python. Skip chapters 1 and 2 and start in chapter 3, which covers components and interfaces. Chapter 5 covers the creation of your first product.
The Five Manual
We're not done yet. There is a bunch of stuff in Zope 2.13 that is not in the official documentation. Namely, the stuff in Five.
ZTK Documentation
ZTK
ZCA
A Comprehensive Guide to Zope Component Architecture offers a good introduction to the programming concepts of ZCA. We also have a new page on Zope Component Architecture which will help you to understand the big picture of ZCA and why it is useful. ZCML ("Z-camel") is a part of ZCA and was introduced in Zope 3, so typically you will find ZCML documented within Zope 3 documentation and book.
Content Components
Views and Viewlets: This tutorial on viewlets also contains some viewlet-related ZCML examples near the end. The "Content Component way" of developing in Zope seems to be a Zope 3 thing and tied to ZCML. Chapter 13+ of Stephan Richter's Zope 3 Developer's Handbook (book) seems to cover this quite well. You will probably also want to check out Philipp Weitershausen's Web Component Development with Zope 3 (book).
Zope 2 Wiki
Main wiki page for all things related to Zope 2.
docs.zope.org
This is the main site for Zope documentation.

First Steps

First, you will need to emerge net-zope/zope (package not on wiki - please add):

# emerge zope

Zope is now installed.

Project Skeleton

Note

Zope should be run by a regular user account, not as the root user.

The first step in using Zope is to ensure that you are using a regular user account. As a regular user, create a new directory called zope_test:

$ cd
$ mkdir zope_test

Now, enter the directory, and create an "instance", which is a set of files and directories that are used to contain a Zope project:

$ cd zope_test
$ /usr/lib/zope-2.13/bin/mkzopeinstance

You will see the following output and will be prompted to answer a few questions:

Please choose a directory in which you'd like to install
Zope "instance home" files such as database files, configuration
files, etc.

Directory: instance
Please choose a username and password for the initial user.
These will be the credentials you use to initially manage
your new Zope instance.

Username: admin
Password: ****
Verify password: ****

Now, we will start our Zope instance:

$ cd instance
$ bin/runzope

Now that Zope is functional, you can go to the localhost:8080/manage URL in your web browser: you will be prompted to log in. Enter the username and password you specified. You are now logged in to the ZMI (Zope Management Interface.)

You can stop your application by pressing Control-C. In the future, you can start and stop your Zope instance using the following commands:

$ zopectl start
$ zopectl stop
Note

zopectl start will cause your instance to run in the background rather than consuming a shell console.

First Project

We will create a single, very primitive Zope package, consisting of an Interface for a TODO class, and a TODO class.

Create the following files and directories relative to your project root:

  • Create the directory lib/python/example.
  • Create the file lib/python/example/__init__.py by typing touch lib/python/example/__init__.py.
  • Create these files:

example-configure.zcml

This file registers the example directory you created in lib/python as a package, so that it is seen by Zope. Edit /etc/package-includes/example-configure.zcml:

/etc/package-includes/example-configure.zcml
<include package="example" />

interfaces.py

The following file defines the ITODO interface, and also uses some Zope Schema functions to define what kind of data we expect to store in objects that implement ITODO. Edit /lib/python/example/interfaces.py with your favorite text editor:

from zope.interface import Interface
from zope.schema import List, Text, TextLine, Int
 
class ITODO(Interface):
    name = TextLine(title=u'Name', required=True)
    todo = List(title=u"TODO Items", required=True, value_type=TextLine(title=u'TODO'))
    daysleft = Int(title=u'Days left to complete', required=True)
    description = Text(title=u'Description', required=True)

TODO.py

Now, we define TODO to be a persistent object, meaning it can be stored in the ZODB. We specify that it implements our previously-defined ITODO interface, and provide reasonable defaults for all values when we create a new TODO object. Edit /lib/python/example/TODO.py using your favorite text editor:

/lib/python/example/TODO.py (python source code)
from persistent import Persistent
from zope.interface import implements
from example.interfaces import ITODO
 
class TODO(Persistent):
    implements(ITODO)
    name = u''
    todo = []
    daysleft = 0
    description = u''

configure.zcml

Create the /lib/python/example/configure.zcml configuration file:

<configure xmlns="http://namespaces.zope.org/zope"
     xmlns:five="http://namespaces.zope.org/five"
     xmlns:browser="http://namespaces.zope.org/browser">
</configure>

Debug Mode

We can test our first project by entering debug mode:

$ bin/zopectl debug
Starting debugger (the name "app" is bound to the top-level Zope object)

Now, let's try creating a new TODO object and writing it out to a ZODB database:

>>> from ZODB import FileStorage, DB
>>> storage = FileStorage.FileStorage('mydatabase.fs')
>>> db = DB(storage)
>>> connection = db.open()
>>> import transaction
>>> root = connection.root()
>>> from example.TODO import TODO
>>> a = TODO
>>> a.name = u'My TODOs'
>>> a.TODOS = [ u'Do Laundry', u'Wash Dishes' ]
>>> a.daysleft = 1
>>> a.description = u'Things I need to do today.'
>>> root[u'today'] = a
>>> transaction.commit()