Difference between pages "Bootloader" and "Grub"

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(I described the basics of what the bootloader does.)
 
 
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The traditional personal computer architecture loads only the first 512 bytes from a disk into memory and begins execution. Operating systems are larger than 512 bytes, so a bootloader deals with loading its own components as well as the operating system into memory. The original bootloader contained enough code to determine the active partition of an MBR disk, load that partition's volume boot record, and pass execution to it. Modern bootloaders are much more capable almost forming operating systems of their own merit. Funtoo offers [[Grub]] as its preferred bootloader though there are several alternatives available.
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Grub is the [[bootloader]] most people will use with Funtoo. Grub is very powerful supporting multiple partition types, filesystems, and operating systems through a modular framework. Grub will generally be installed through the <code>[[grub-install]]</code> script. That script will translate the Linux device node such as <code>/dev/sda</code> into a Grub device such as <code>(hd1)</code>. This has to be done because Grub will only know about devices that your system's firmware knows about. It generates a core Grub image with enough support to read the [[The_Root_Filesystem#.2Fboot_:_Static_files_of_the_boot_loader|boot]] partition. It modifies the Grub [[boot image]] so that it can find the core image and installs the boot image to the master boot record.
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<issues/>
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[[Category:Grub]]
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[[Category:sys-boot]]

Latest revision as of 17:15, 23 November 2010

Grub is the bootloader most people will use with Funtoo. Grub is very powerful supporting multiple partition types, filesystems, and operating systems through a modular framework. Grub will generally be installed through the grub-install script. That script will translate the Linux device node such as /dev/sda into a Grub device such as (hd1). This has to be done because Grub will only know about devices that your system's firmware knows about. It generates a core Grub image with enough support to read the boot partition. It modifies the Grub boot image so that it can find the core image and installs the boot image to the master boot record.

<issues/>