Difference between pages "Learning Linux LVM, Part 1" and "Install/de/Partitioning"

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{{Article
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<noinclude>
|Subtitle=Storage management magic with Logical Volume Management
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{{InstallPart|the process of partitioning and filesystem creation}}
|Author=Drobbins
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</noinclude>
}}
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===Vorbereiten der Festplatte ===
== LVM intro ==
+
  
In this series, I'm going to show you how to install and use the new Logical Volume Management support built-in to the Linux kernel. If you've never used a form of LVM before, you're in for a treat; it's a wonderful technology. Before we actually get LVM up and running, I'm going to explain exactly what it is and how it works. Then, we'll be ready to test out LVM and get the most out of it.
+
Diese Sektion handelt über die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten Funtoo Linux auf einer Festplatte zu installieren und zu booten.
  
If you're like me, then your experience with UNIX and Linux began on a PC platform, rather than on large, commercial UNIX servers and workstations. On the basic PC, we've always had to deal with partitioning our hard drives. PC people are generally well-acquainted with tools such as fdisk, which are used to create and delete primary and extended partitions on hard disks. Hard disk partitioning is an annoying but accepted part of the process of getting an operating system up and running.
+
==== Einleitung ====
  
Hard drive partitioning can be annoying because to do a good job you really need to accurately estimate how much space you'll need for each partition. If you make a poor estimation, your Linux system could possibly be crippled -- to fix the problem, it's possible that you might even need to perform a full system backup, wipe your hard drives clean, and then restore all your data to a new (and presumably better) partition layout. Ick! These are exactly the kinds of situations that sysadmins try their best to avoid in the first place.
+
Früher gab es nur eine Variante einen PC zu booten, alle Desktop- und Servercomputer hatten einen voreingestellten PC  BIOS, alle Festplatten nutzten den Master Boot Record (MBR) um das System zu booten und unsere Festplatten waren  mit dem MBR Partitionsschema in verschiedene Regionen partitioniert. Das war einfach wie's gemacht wurde. Und uns gefiel es!
  
While partitions were once static storage regions, thankfully, we now have a proliferation of PC repartitioning tools (PowerQuest's Partition Magic product is one of the most popular). These tools allow you to boot your system with a special disk and dynamically resize your partitions and filesystems. Once you reboot, you have newly resized partitions, hopefully getting you out of your storage crunch. These partition resizing tools are great and solve the problem storage management for some. But are they perfect? Not exactly.
+
Dann kamen EFI und UEFI, neue firmware designt das System zu booten, gemeinsam mit GTP Partitionstabellen um Partitionen auf Festplatten größer als 2.2TB zu definieren.
 +
Plötzlich haben wir eine breite Wahl von Optionen, Linux Systeme zu installieren und zu booten. Damit haben wir nun eine komplexere Situation als damals.
  
Tools like Partition Magic are great for workstations, but aren't really adequate for servers. First of all, they require you to reboot your system. This is something most sysadmins desperately try to avoid doing. What if you simply can't reboot your machine every time your storage needs change, such as if your storage needs change dramatically on a weekly basis? What happens if you need to expand a filesystem so that it spans more than one hard drive, or what do you do if you need to dynamically expand or shrink a volume's storage capacity while allowing Apache to continue to serve Web pages? In a highly available, dynamic environment, a basic partition resizer just won't work. For these and other situations, Logical Volume Management is an excellent (if not perfect) solution.
+
Nehmen wir einen Moment um die verfügbaren Optionen, zur Konfiguration der Festplatte um Linux zu booten, zu besprechen.
 +
Diese Installationsanleitung nutzt und empfiehlt die old-school Methode des BIOS bootens mit hilfe des MBR. Es funktioniert und (außer in seltenen Fällen) ist universal unterstützt.
 +
Mit dieser Methode ist nichts falsch, solange deine Systemfestplatte nur bis zu 2TB groß ist. Solange wird diese Methode die volle Kapazität deiner Festplatte nutzen.  
  
== Enter LVM ==
+
Es gibt aber einige Situationen, in denen diese old-school Methode nicht optimal ist. Falls du eine Systemfestplatte >2TB hast, dann erlauben dir MBR Partitionen keinen Zugang zum gesamten Speicher.
 +
Das ist also ein Grund gegen diese Methode. Ein Weiterer ist, dass es "PC" Systeme gibt, welche das booten via BIOS nicht mehr unterstützen und dich zwingen via UEFI zu booten.
 +
Aus Mitleid für die PC-Nutzer, die in diese Zwickmühle geraten, decken wir das Booten via UEFI zusätzlich in dieser Installationsanleitung ab .
  
Now, let's take a look at how LVM solves these problems. To create an LVM logical volume, we follow a three-step process. First, we need to select the physical storage resources that are going to be used for LVM. Typically, these are standard partitions but can also be Linux software RAID volumes that we've created. In LVM terminology, these storage resources are called "physical volumes". Our first step in setting up LVM involves properly initializing these partitions so that they can be recognized by the LVM system. This involves setting the correct partition type if we're adding a physical partition, and running the pvcreate command.
+
Unsere empfehlung ist immer noch die old-school Methode, es seiden du hast Gründe dagegen.
 +
Der Bootloader, den wir nutzen um den Linux Kernel zu laden, heißt GRUB. Also nennen wir die Methode  '''BIOS + GRUB(MBR) ''' Methode.
 +
Es ist die traditionelle Methode um ein Linux System bootbar zu machen.  
  
Once we have one or more physical volumes initialized for use by LVM, we can move on to step two -- creating a volume group. You can think of a volume group as a pool of storage that consists of one or more physical volumes. While LVM is running, we can add physical volumes to the volume group or even remove them. However, we can't mount or create filesystems on a volume group directly. Instead, we can tell LVM to create one or more "logical volumes" using our volume group storage pool:
+
Falls du via UEFI booten willst, empfehlen wir dir nicht den MBR zum booten zu nutzen, was nur manche Systeme unterstützen, sondern wir empfehlen UEFI zu nutzen um GRUB zu laden.
 +
GRUB wird dann das Linux System booten. Wir referenzieren zu dieser Methode mit '''UEFI + GRUB (GPT)'''.
  
[[File:l-lvm-1.gif|frame|A volume group is created out of physical volumes]]
+
Und ja, es gibt noch weitere Methoden, von denen einige auf der [[Boot Methods]] Seite dokumentiert sind.
 +
Unsere Empfehlung war immer die  '''BIOS + GRUB (GPT)'' Methode, welche allerdings nun nicht mehr konsistent und hardwareübergreifend unterstützt wird.
  
Creating an LVM logical volume is really easy, and once it's created we can go ahead and put a filesystem on it, mount it, and start using the volume to store our files. To create a logical volume, we use the lvcreate command, specifying the name of our new volume, the size we'd like the volume to be, and the volume group that we'd like this particluar logical volume to be part of. The LVM system will then allocate storage from the volume group we specify and create our new volume, which is now ready for use. Once created, we can put an ext2 or ReiserFS filesystem on it, mount it, and use it as we like.
+
'''Die größte Frage ist immer -- Welche Bootmethode sollst du nutzen?''' Hier ist mein Gedankengang.
  
[[File:l-lvm-2.gif|frame|Creating two logical volumes from our existing volume group]]
+
;Grundsatz 1 - Old School: Falls du verlässlich via System Rescue CD booten kannst und dir ein leicht blaues Menü angezeigt wird, dann bootet die CD via BIOS und es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, das du auch Funtoo Linux via BIOS booten kannst. Also gehe old-school und nutze diese Methode, es sei denn du hast Gründe via UEFI zu booten. Zum Beispiel eine Systemfestplatte >2.2TB  In diesem Fall beachte Grundsatz 2, wenn dein System UEFI unterstützt.
  
== Extents ==
+
;Grundsatz 2 - New School: Falls du verlässlich via System Rescue CD booten kannst und dir ein schwarz und weißes Menü, --Glückwunsch, dein System ist konfiguriert UEFI zu unterstützen. Das bedeutet das du bereit bist Funtoo Linux einzurichten um via UEFI zu booten. Dein System könnte immer noch das Booten übers BIOS unterstützen, aber versuch es einfach mal mit UEFI als erstes. Du kannst in deiner BIOS Konfiguration herum stochern und damit spielen.
  
Behind the scenes, the LVM system allocates storage in equal-sized "chunks", called extents. We can specify the particular extent size to use at volume group creation time. The size of an extent defaults to 4Mb, which is perfect for most uses. One of the beauties of LVM is that the physical storage locations of the extents used for one of our logical volumes (in other words, what disk they're stored on) can be dynamically changed while our logical volume is mounted and in use! The LVM system ensures that our logical volumes continue to operate perfectly while allowing the administrator to physically change where everything is stored.
+
;Was ist der große Unterschied zwischen Old School und New School?: Hier ist der Deal. Falls du mit old-school MBR Partitionen gehst, deine <code>/boot</code> Partition wird ein ext2 Dateisystem haben, und du wirst <code>fdisk</code>nutzen um MBR Partitionen zu erstellen. Fallse du mit new-school GPT Partitionen und booten via UEFI gehst, wird deine <code>/boot</code> Partition ein  vfat Dateisystem haben, da UEFI dies lesen kann,außerdem wirst du <code>gdisk</code> nutzen um GPT Partitionen zu erstellen. Und du wirst GRUB ein wenig anders installieren. Das ist alles was es zu wissen gibt, für den Fall das du neugierig warst.
  
Of course, since everything is created out of equally-sized extents, it's really easy to allocate some additional extents for an already-existing logical volume -- in other words, dynamically "grow" the volume:
+
;Also Note: To install Funtoo Linux to boot via the New School UEFI method, you must boot System Rescue CD using UEFI -- and see an initial black and white screen. Otherwise, UEFI will not be active and you will not be able to set it up!
  
[[File:l-lvm-3.gif|frame|Adding additional extents from our volume group, expanding the size of our logical volume.]]
+
{{Note|'''Einige motherboards unterstützen UEFI nicht richtig.''' Informiere dich. Zum Beispiel, das Award BIOS in meinem Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 hat eine Option das Booten via UEFI für CD/DVD zu aktivieren. '''Das ist aber nicht ausreichend um UEFI für Festplatten zu nutzen und Funtoo Linux zu installieren.''' UEFI muss für entfernbare Datenträger und fixierte Datenträger unterstützt werden. (Damit du deine neue Funtoo Installation booten kannst) Tatsächlich hagen die neueren revisionen des boards(rev 3.0) volle UEFI unterstützung. Das ist der wichtigste Punkt des dritten Grundsatzes -- kenne die Hardware. }}
  
Once the logical volume has been expanded, you can then expand your ext2 or ReiserFS filesystem to take advantage of this new space. If you use a program such as resize_reiserfs, this filesystem expansion can also happen while the volume is mounted and being used! Truly amazing -- with LVM and online filesystem expansion utilties, it's no longer necessary to reboot your system or even drop to runlevel 1 to change your storage configuration.
+
==== Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method ====
  
The only time you need to shut down your system is when you need to add new physical disks. Once new disks have been added, you then can add these new physical volumes to your volume group(s) to create a fresh supply of extents.
+
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, [[#New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method|click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.]]}}
  
== Setting up LVM ==
+
===== Preparation =====
  
OK, let's get LVM installed. LVM consists of two parts: a kernel part and a suite of user-space tools. You may already have LVM support available on your system, and if not, it's a simple matter to install the appropriate tools using your distribution's package manager. On Gentoo or Funtoo Linux, this is done as follows:
+
First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that <code>/dev/sda</code> is the disk that you want to partition:
  
 
<console>
 
<console>
# ##i##emerge sys-fs/lvm2
+
# ##i##fdisk -l /dev/sda
 +
 
 +
Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
 +
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 +
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disk label type: gpt
 +
 
 +
 
 +
#        Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 +
1        2048  1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
If you compiled your kernel manually, you'll want to reconfigure and compile your kernel so that LVM support is enabled.
+
Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using <code>sgdisk</code>:
 +
{{fancywarning|This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are '''strongly''' cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.}}
  
 
<console>
 
<console>
# ##i##cd /usr/src/linux
+
# ##i##sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda
# ##i##make menuconfig
+
 
 +
Creating new GPT entries.
 +
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
 +
other utilities.
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
***************************************************************
 +
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
 +
in memory.
 +
***************************************************************
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
===== Partitioning =====
 +
 
 +
Now we will use <code>fdisk</code> to create the MBR partition table and partitions:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##fdisk /dev/sda
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Within <code>fdisk</code>, follow these steps:
 +
 
 +
'''Empty the partition table''':
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##o ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (1-4, default 1): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+128M ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (2-4, default 2): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+2G ↵
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##t ↵
 +
Partition number (1,2, default 2): ##i## ↵
 +
Hex code (type L to list all codes): ##i##82 ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create the root partition:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (3,4, default 3): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Verify the partition table:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##p
 +
 
 +
Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
 +
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 +
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disklabel type: dos
 +
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6
 +
 
 +
Device    Boot    Start      End    Blocks  Id System
 +
/dev/sda1          2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
 +
/dev/sda2        264192  4458495  2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
 +
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Write the parition table to disk:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##w
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.
 +
 
 +
{{Note|You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to [[#Creating filesystems|Creating filesystems]].}}
 +
 
 +
==== New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.}}
 +
 
 +
The <tt>gdisk</tt> commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start <code>gdisk</code>:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##gdisk /dev/sda
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Within <tt>gdisk</tt>, follow these steps:
 +
 
 +
'''Create a new empty partition table''' (This ''will'' erase all data on the disk when saved):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##o ↵
 +
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
 +
Proceed? (Y/N): ##i##y ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##1 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+500M ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##2 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+4G ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##8200 ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 3''' (root):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##3 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵##!i## (for rest of disk)
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Along the way, you can type "<tt>p</tt>" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "<tt>d</tt>" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "<tt>w</tt>" to write your configuration to disk:
 +
 
 +
'''Write Partition Table To Disk''':
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##w ↵
 +
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): ##i##Y ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
The partition table will now be written to disk and <tt>gdisk</tt> will close.
 +
 
 +
Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following ''block devices'' under Linux:
 +
 
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda1</tt>, which will be used to hold the <tt>/boot</tt> filesystem,
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda2</tt>, which will be used for swap space, and
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda3</tt>, which will hold your root filesystem.
 +
 
 +
==== Creating filesystems ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|This section covers both BIOS ''and'' UEFI installs. Don't skip it!}}
 +
 
 +
Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem ''metadata''. This process is known as ''creating a filesystem'' on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.
 +
 
 +
Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.
 +
 
 +
You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the <code>mkswap</code> command. Then we'll run the <code>swapon</code> command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkswap /dev/sda2
 +
# ##i##swapon /dev/sda2
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
You'll find the LVM options under the "Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM)" section, under "Device Drivers":
+
Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.
  
{{kernelop|title=Device Drivers,Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM)|desc=
+
{{fancywarning|1=
--- Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM)                   
+
When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of <code>openvz-rhel6-stable</code> are '''not''' compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.
{M}  RAID support                                                   
+
<M>     Linear (append) mode                                         
+
<M>    RAID-0 (striping) mode                                       
+
-M-    RAID-1 (mirroring) mode                                       
+
-M-    RAID-10 (mirrored striping) mode                             
+
-M-    RAID-4/RAID-5/RAID-6 mode                                     
+
<M>    Multipath I/O support                                         
+
<M>     Faulty test module for MD                                     
+
<M>  Block device as cache                                           
+
[ ]    Bcache debugging                                             
+
[ ]    Debug closures                                               
+
<M>  Device mapper support                                           
+
[ ]    Device mapper debugging support                               
+
[ ]    Keep stack trace of persistent data block lock holders       
+
<M>    Crypt target support                                         
+
<M>    Snapshot target                                               
+
<M>    Thin provisioning target                                     
+
<M>    Cache target (EXPERIMENTAL)                                   
+
<M>      MQ Cache Policy (EXPERIMENTAL)                             
+
<M>      Cleaner Cache Policy (EXPERIMENTAL)                         
+
<M>    Era target (EXPERIMENTAL)                                     
+
<M>    Mirror target                                                 
+
<M>      Mirror userspace logging                                   
+
<M>    RAID 1/4/5/6/10 target                                       
+
<M>    Zero target                                                   
+
<M>    Multipath target                                             
+
<M>      I/O Path Selector based on the number of in-flight I/Os     
+
<M>      I/O Path Selector based on the service time                 
+
<M>    I/O delaying target                                           
+
[*]    DM uevents                                                   
+
<M>    Flakey target                                                 
+
<M>    Verity target support                                         
+
<M>    Switch target support (EXPERIMENTAL)                         
+
 
}}
 
}}
  
I recommend enabling all features. Also ensure that LVM is enabled for your initramfs. Remember that if you are putting any main filesystems on LVM, you will need LVM compiled into your kernel, rather than a module, or you'll need an LVM-aware initramfs.
+
==== Mounting filesystems ====
  
Also be sure to enable any necessary startup scripts to initialize LVM. On many distributions, including Funtoo Linux, this is done for you, provided that sufficient kernel support is available. The basic commands that these scripts will run are the following, at boot:
+
Mount the newly-created filesystems as follows, creating <code>/mnt/funtoo</code> as the installation mount point:
  
 
<console>
 
<console>
/sbin/vgscan
+
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo
/sbin/vgchange -a y
+
# ##i##mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
These lines will scan for all available volume groups and activate them. At shutdown, something like this will run:
+
Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for <code>/home</code> or anything else:
  
 
<console>
 
<console>
/sbin/vgchange -a n
+
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
While this stuff is handled for you automatically, if you ever boot from a rescue CD or USB stick, you may need to type {{c|vgscan}} and {{c|vgchange -a y}} as root before your logical volumes are available for use.
+
If you have <code>/tmp</code> or <code>/var/tmp</code> on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:
  
That's it for this article. Next article, I'll show you how to create your own logical volumes and unleash the power of LVM. I'll see you then!
+
<console>
{{ArticleFooter}}
+
# ##i##chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp
 +
</console>

Revision as of 17:17, January 27, 2015


Note

This is a template that is used as part of the Installation instructions which covers: the process of partitioning and filesystem creation. Templates are being used to allow multiple variant install guides that use most of the same re-usable parts.


Vorbereiten der Festplatte

Diese Sektion handelt über die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten Funtoo Linux auf einer Festplatte zu installieren und zu booten.

Einleitung

Früher gab es nur eine Variante einen PC zu booten, alle Desktop- und Servercomputer hatten einen voreingestellten PC BIOS, alle Festplatten nutzten den Master Boot Record (MBR) um das System zu booten und unsere Festplatten waren mit dem MBR Partitionsschema in verschiedene Regionen partitioniert. Das war einfach wie's gemacht wurde. Und uns gefiel es!

Dann kamen EFI und UEFI, neue firmware designt das System zu booten, gemeinsam mit GTP Partitionstabellen um Partitionen auf Festplatten größer als 2.2TB zu definieren. Plötzlich haben wir eine breite Wahl von Optionen, Linux Systeme zu installieren und zu booten. Damit haben wir nun eine komplexere Situation als damals.

Nehmen wir einen Moment um die verfügbaren Optionen, zur Konfiguration der Festplatte um Linux zu booten, zu besprechen. Diese Installationsanleitung nutzt und empfiehlt die old-school Methode des BIOS bootens mit hilfe des MBR. Es funktioniert und (außer in seltenen Fällen) ist universal unterstützt. Mit dieser Methode ist nichts falsch, solange deine Systemfestplatte nur bis zu 2TB groß ist. Solange wird diese Methode die volle Kapazität deiner Festplatte nutzen.

Es gibt aber einige Situationen, in denen diese old-school Methode nicht optimal ist. Falls du eine Systemfestplatte >2TB hast, dann erlauben dir MBR Partitionen keinen Zugang zum gesamten Speicher. Das ist also ein Grund gegen diese Methode. Ein Weiterer ist, dass es "PC" Systeme gibt, welche das booten via BIOS nicht mehr unterstützen und dich zwingen via UEFI zu booten. Aus Mitleid für die PC-Nutzer, die in diese Zwickmühle geraten, decken wir das Booten via UEFI zusätzlich in dieser Installationsanleitung ab .

Unsere empfehlung ist immer noch die old-school Methode, es seiden du hast Gründe dagegen. Der Bootloader, den wir nutzen um den Linux Kernel zu laden, heißt GRUB. Also nennen wir die Methode BIOS + GRUB(MBR) Methode. Es ist die traditionelle Methode um ein Linux System bootbar zu machen.

Falls du via UEFI booten willst, empfehlen wir dir nicht den MBR zum booten zu nutzen, was nur manche Systeme unterstützen, sondern wir empfehlen UEFI zu nutzen um GRUB zu laden. GRUB wird dann das Linux System booten. Wir referenzieren zu dieser Methode mit UEFI + GRUB (GPT).

Und ja, es gibt noch weitere Methoden, von denen einige auf der Boot Methods Seite dokumentiert sind. Unsere Empfehlung war immer die 'BIOS + GRUB (GPT) Methode, welche allerdings nun nicht mehr konsistent und hardwareübergreifend unterstützt wird.

Die größte Frage ist immer -- Welche Bootmethode sollst du nutzen? Hier ist mein Gedankengang.

Grundsatz 1 - Old School
Falls du verlässlich via System Rescue CD booten kannst und dir ein leicht blaues Menü angezeigt wird, dann bootet die CD via BIOS und es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, das du auch Funtoo Linux via BIOS booten kannst. Also gehe old-school und nutze diese Methode, es sei denn du hast Gründe via UEFI zu booten. Zum Beispiel eine Systemfestplatte >2.2TB In diesem Fall beachte Grundsatz 2, wenn dein System UEFI unterstützt.
Grundsatz 2 - New School
Falls du verlässlich via System Rescue CD booten kannst und dir ein schwarz und weißes Menü, --Glückwunsch, dein System ist konfiguriert UEFI zu unterstützen. Das bedeutet das du bereit bist Funtoo Linux einzurichten um via UEFI zu booten. Dein System könnte immer noch das Booten übers BIOS unterstützen, aber versuch es einfach mal mit UEFI als erstes. Du kannst in deiner BIOS Konfiguration herum stochern und damit spielen.
Was ist der große Unterschied zwischen Old School und New School?
Hier ist der Deal. Falls du mit old-school MBR Partitionen gehst, deine /boot Partition wird ein ext2 Dateisystem haben, und du wirst fdisknutzen um MBR Partitionen zu erstellen. Fallse du mit new-school GPT Partitionen und booten via UEFI gehst, wird deine /boot Partition ein vfat Dateisystem haben, da UEFI dies lesen kann,außerdem wirst du gdisk nutzen um GPT Partitionen zu erstellen. Und du wirst GRUB ein wenig anders installieren. Das ist alles was es zu wissen gibt, für den Fall das du neugierig warst.
Also Note
To install Funtoo Linux to boot via the New School UEFI method, you must boot System Rescue CD using UEFI -- and see an initial black and white screen. Otherwise, UEFI will not be active and you will not be able to set it up!
Note

Einige motherboards unterstützen UEFI nicht richtig. Informiere dich. Zum Beispiel, das Award BIOS in meinem Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 hat eine Option das Booten via UEFI für CD/DVD zu aktivieren. Das ist aber nicht ausreichend um UEFI für Festplatten zu nutzen und Funtoo Linux zu installieren. UEFI muss für entfernbare Datenträger und fixierte Datenträger unterstützt werden. (Damit du deine neue Funtoo Installation booten kannst) Tatsächlich hagen die neueren revisionen des boards(rev 3.0) volle UEFI unterstützung. Das ist der wichtigste Punkt des dritten Grundsatzes -- kenne die Hardware.

Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.

Preparation

First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that /dev/sda is the disk that you want to partition:

# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: gpt


#         Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 1         2048   1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem

Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using sgdisk:

Warning

This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are strongly cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.

# sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda

Creating new GPT entries.
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
other utilities.

This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:

***************************************************************
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
in memory. 
***************************************************************
Partitioning

Now we will use fdisk to create the MBR partition table and partitions:

# fdisk /dev/sda

Within fdisk, follow these steps:

Empty the partition table:

Command (m for help): o ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (1-4, default 1): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +128M ↵

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (2-4, default 2): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +2G ↵
Command (m for help): t ↵ 
Partition number (1,2, default 2): 
Hex code (type L to list all codes): 82 ↵

Create the root partition:

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (3,4, default 3): 
First sector: 
Last sector: 

Verify the partition table:

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6

Device    Boot     Start       End    Blocks  Id System
/dev/sda1           2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
/dev/sda2         264192   4458495   2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux

Write the parition table to disk:

Command (m for help): w

Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.

Note

You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to Creating filesystems.

New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.

The gdisk commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start gdisk:

# gdisk /dev/sda

Within gdisk, follow these steps:

Create a new empty partition table (This will erase all data on the disk when saved):

Command: o ↵
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
Proceed? (Y/N): y ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 1 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +500M ↵
Hex Code: 

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 2 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +4G ↵
Hex Code: 8200 ↵

Create Partition 3 (root):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 3 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector:  (for rest of disk)
Hex Code: 

Along the way, you can type "p" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "d" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "w" to write your configuration to disk:

Write Partition Table To Disk:

Command: w ↵
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): Y ↵

The partition table will now be written to disk and gdisk will close.

Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following block devices under Linux:

  • /dev/sda1, which will be used to hold the /boot filesystem,
  • /dev/sda2, which will be used for swap space, and
  • /dev/sda3, which will hold your root filesystem.

Creating filesystems

Note

This section covers both BIOS and UEFI installs. Don't skip it!

Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem metadata. This process is known as creating a filesystem on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.

Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:

# mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1

If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:

# mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1

Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.

You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the mkswap command. Then we'll run the swapon command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:

# mkswap /dev/sda2
# swapon /dev/sda2

Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:

# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3

...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:

# mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3

Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.

Warning

When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of openvz-rhel6-stable are not compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.

Mounting filesystems

Mount the newly-created filesystems as follows, creating /mnt/funtoo as the installation mount point:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo
# mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
# mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot

Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for /home or anything else:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
# mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home

If you have /tmp or /var/tmp on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:

# chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp