Difference between pages "Forking An Ebuild" and "Install/Partitioning/pt-br"

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(Introdução)
 
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Often, a Funtoo developer needs to fork an upstream ebuild. This is necessary when we want to apply fixes to it. This page will explain the concepts of forking and how this works in the context of Funtoo.
 
  
== Portage Tree Generation ==
+
===Particionamento===
  
Funtoo Linux generates its Portage tree using a special script that essentially takes a Gentoo tree as its starting point, and then applies various modifications to it. The modifications involve adding packages from various overlays, including our [[Overlay:Funtoo-overlay]]. Some packages added are brand new, while other packages are our special forked versions that replace existing packages.
+
=== Prepare o Disco Rígido ===
  
In the vast majority of cases, when we fork a package, we take full responsibility for all ebuilds associated with that package, meaning that we have a full copy of the <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> directory in one of our overlays.
+
==== Introdução ====
  
If you're interested in seeing the actual script that does all these things, take a look at the following files:
+
Em tempos passados, só havia um jeito de bootar o computador compatível com a arquitetura PC. Todos os nossos desktops e servidores tinham uma BIOS padrão, todos os nossos hard drives utilizavam Master Boot Records, e eram particionados utilizando esquema de partição MBR. E nós gostávamos disso daquele jeito mesmo!
  
; http://git.funtoo.org/funtoo-overlay/tree/funtoo/scripts/current-update.sh: cronned script that calls <tt>merge.py</tt>.
+
Então, depois veio os EFI e UEFI, que são firmware em novo-estilo projetados para bootar sistemas, junto a tabelas de partição GPT para suportar discos maiores que 2.2TB. Tudo repentino, nós tínhamos uma variedade de opções para bootar os sistemas boot Linux, tornando o que uma vez era um método único de encaixe de tudo  (one-method-fits-all) aproximar-se á algo muito mais complexo.
;http://git.funtoo.org/funtoo-overlay/tree/funtoo/scripts/merge.py: python script that does the heavy lifting of combining Gentoo tree with various overlays, including our flora and funtoo-overlay. When we want to change what overlays we merge, what packages we exclude as a matter of policy (such as stale packages in some overlays), we make changes to this file.
+
; http://git.funtoo.org/funtoo-overlay/tree/funtoo/scripts/merge_utils.py: python module that contains classes and methods that implement the merging functionality.
+
  
== Forking an Ebuild ==
+
Vamos parar por um momento para rever as opções de boot disponíveis para você. Esse pequeno Guia utiliza, e recomenda, o método da BIOS da velha guarda bootando e usando um MBR. Funciona. Não há nada de errado com ele. Se seu disco é do tamanho de  2TB ou menor, ele não vai impedir que você use toda a capacidade do seu disco, também.
  
In general, we fork ebuilds from Gentoo that we want to modify in some way. Before you fork an ebuild, it's important to understand that in general we fork entire packages, not just a single ebuild. This means that if you want to make some changes to <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt>, you are going to fork all <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> ebuilds, and then Funtoo will be responsible for continuing to maintain these ebuilds until the package is unforked. Here are the steps we would use to fork <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt>:
+
Mas, há alguns situações onde  o método da não é satisfatório. Se você obtiver um disco de tamando superior à 2TB, então partições MBR não o permitirão acessar todo o seu  armazenamento (storage). Então essa é uma rasão. Outra rasão é que há Another reason is that there are some so-called "PC" systems out there that don't support BIOS booting anymore, and force you to use UEFI to boot. So, out of compassion for people who fall into this predicament, this Install Guide documents UEFI booting too.
  
# Find <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> in you regular Portage tree. Make sure you have run <tt>emerge --sync</tt> recently to ensure it is up-to-date. If you want to fork from very recent changes that are not yet in our tree, you may need to grab the most recent Gentoo Portage tree to serve as your source for <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> (this typically isn't necessary.)
+
Our recommendation is still to go old-school unless you have reason not to. We call this method the '''BIOS + GRUB (MBR)''' method. It's the traditional method of setting up a PC-compatible system to boot Linux.
# Copy the <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> directory in its entirety to <tt>funtoo-overlay/sys-foo/bar</tt>.
+
# Make any necessary modifications to <tt>funtoo-overlay/sys-foo/bar</tt>.
+
# Perform some funtoo-ification steps prior to commit.
+
# Add and commit the changes to funtoo-overlay.
+
# Push changes to funtoo-overlay.
+
  
At this point, the forked <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> package will be part of funtoo-overlay. The next time our unified Portage tree is generated by <tt>merge.py</tt> (the one that users have in their <tt>/usr/portage</tt> and is updated via <tt>emerge --sync</tt>), your forked ebuild will be used in place of the Gentoo ebuild. Why is this? It is because our <tt>merge.py</tt> script has been defined with a policy that any ebuilds in funtoo-overlay will replace any existing Gentoo ebuilds if they exist. The mechanism of replacement is that our <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> directory will be used in place of Gentoo's <tt>sys-foo/bar</tt> directory. So this is how the forking process works.
+
If you need to use UEFI to boot, we recommend not using the MBR at all for booting, as some systems support this, but others don't. Instead, we recommend using UEFI to boot GRUB, which in turn will load Linux. We refer to this method as the '''UEFI + GRUB (GPT)''' method.
  
== Funtoo-ification ==
+
And yes, there are even more methods, some of which are documented on the [[Boot Methods]] page. We used to recommend a '''BIOS + GRUB (GPT)''' method but it is not consistently supported across a wide variety of hardware.
  
When we fork a package from Gentoo, we perform the following tweaks to the package directory before committing:
+
'''The big question is -- which boot method should you use?''' Here's how to tell.
  
# Removal of <tt>ChangeLog</tt>.
+
;Principle 1 - Old School: If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial light blue menu, you are booting the CD using the BIOS, and it's likely that you can thus boot Funtoo Linux using the BIOS. So, go old-school and use BIOS booting, ''unless'' you have some reason to use UEFI, such as having a >2.2TB system disk. In that case, see Principle 2, as your system may also support UEFI booting.
# Run <tt>ebuild foo-1.0.ebuild digest</tt> before committing. This will cause the <tt>Manifest</tt> file to be regenerated. Gentoo has a lot more entries in this file than we do, since we use mini-Manfiests that only include DIST listings (for distfiles only.) We want to commit our mini-Manifest (still called <tt>Manifest</tt>, just with less entries in it) rather than the one that came from Gentoo.
+
# Edit the top of each ebuild, and remove all <tt>Copyright</tt> and <tt>$Header:</tt> lines at the top of the file. We have a LICENSE.txt and COPYRIGHT.txt file in the root of our Portage tree, which is easier to maintain than keeping all the years up-to-date in each ebuild. Also, the <tt>$Header:</tt> line is there for the CVS version control system in Gentoo which Funtoo does not use. ''The only comment that should remain on the top of the ebuild is the one stating that it is distributed under the GPLv2.''.
+
  
Here are a few additional changes that you are allowed to make to any forked ebuilds:
+
;Principle 2 - New School: If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial black and white menu -- congratulations, your system is configured to support UEFI booting. This means that you are ready to install Funtoo Linux to boot via UEFI. Your system may still support BIOS booting, but just be trying UEFI first. You can poke around in your BIOS boot configuration and play with this.
  
# Line length greater than 80 characters. Gentoo enforces an 80-character line length limit. We don't.
+
;What's the Big Difference between Old School and New School?: Here's the deal. If you go with old-school MBR partitions, your <code>/boot</code> partition will be an ext2 filesystem, and you'll use <code>fdisk</code> to create your MBR partitions. If you go with new-school GPT partitions and UEFI booting, your <code>/boot</code> partition will be a vfat filesystem, because this is what UEFI is able to read, and you will use <code>gdisk</code> to create your GPT partitions. And you'll install GRUB a bit differently. That's about all it comes down to, in case you were curious.
# <tt>KEYWORDS</tt> of <tt>*</tt> and <tt>~*</tt>. Gentoo does not allow these shortcuts. We do. They allow you to say "all arches" and "all unstable arches" in a concise way. Gentoo doesn't allow these shortcuts because it's Gentoo's policy to have each arch team manually approve each package. We do not have this policy so we can use the shortcuts.
+
# Use of <tt>4-python</tt> EAPI. We allow the use of this EAPI for enhanced python functionality.
+
  
[[Category:Development]]
+
{{Note|'''Some motherboards may appear to support UEFI, but don't.''' Do your research. For example, the Award BIOS in my Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 has an option to enable UEFI boot for CD/DVD. '''This is not sufficient for enabling UEFI boot for hard drives and installing Funtoo Linux.''' UEFI must be supported for both removable media (so you can boot System Rescue CD using UEFI) as well as fixed media (so you can boot your new Funtoo Linux installation.) It turns out that later revisions of this board (rev 3.0) have a new BIOS that fully supports UEFI boot.  This may point to a third principle -- know thy hardware.}}
 +
 
 +
==== Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, [[#New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method|click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.]]}}
 +
 
 +
===== Preparation =====
 +
 
 +
First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that <code>/dev/sda</code> is the disk that you want to partition:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##fdisk -l /dev/sda
 +
 
 +
Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
 +
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 +
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disk label type: gpt
 +
 
 +
 
 +
#        Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 +
1        2048  1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using <code>sgdisk</code>:
 +
{{fancywarning|This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are '''strongly''' cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.}}
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda
 +
 
 +
Creating new GPT entries.
 +
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
 +
other utilities.
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
***************************************************************
 +
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
 +
in memory.
 +
***************************************************************
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
===== Partitioning =====
 +
 
 +
Now we will use <code>fdisk</code> to create the MBR partition table and partitions:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##fdisk /dev/sda
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Within <code>fdisk</code>, follow these steps:
 +
 
 +
'''Empty the partition table''':
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##o ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (1-4, default 1): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+128M ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (2-4, default 2): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+2G ↵
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##t ↵
 +
Partition number (1,2, default 2): ##i## ↵
 +
Hex code (type L to list all codes): ##i##82 ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create the root partition:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (3,4, default 3): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Verify the partition table:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##p
 +
 
 +
Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
 +
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 +
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disklabel type: dos
 +
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6
 +
 
 +
Device    Boot    Start      End    Blocks  Id System
 +
/dev/sda1          2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
 +
/dev/sda2        264192  4458495  2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
 +
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Write the parition table to disk:'''
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##w
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.
 +
 
 +
{{Note|You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to [[#Creating filesystems|Creating filesystems]].}}
 +
 
 +
==== New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.}}
 +
 
 +
The <tt>gdisk</tt> commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start <code>gdisk</code>:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##gdisk
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Within <tt>gdisk</tt>, follow these steps:
 +
 
 +
'''Create a new empty partition table''' (This ''will'' erase all data on the disk when saved):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##o ↵
 +
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
 +
Proceed? (Y/N): ##i##y ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##1 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+500M ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##2 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+4G ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##8200 ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 3''' (root):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##3 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵##!i## (for rest of disk)
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Along the way, you can type "<tt>p</tt>" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "<tt>d</tt>" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "<tt>w</tt>" to write your configuration to disk:
 +
 
 +
'''Write Partition Table To Disk''':
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##w ↵
 +
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): ##i##Y ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
The partition table will now be written to disk and <tt>gdisk</tt> will close.
 +
 
 +
Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following ''block devices'' under Linux:
 +
 
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda1</tt>, which will be used to hold the <tt>/boot</tt> filesystem,
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda2</tt>, which will be used for swap space, and
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda3</tt>, which will hold your root filesystem.
 +
 
 +
==== Creating filesystems ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|This section covers both BIOS ''and'' UEFI installs. Don't skip it!}}
 +
 
 +
Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem ''metadata''. This process is known as ''creating a filesystem'' on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.
 +
 
 +
Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.
 +
 
 +
You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the <code>mkswap</code> command. Then we'll run the <code>swapon</code> command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkswap /dev/sda2
 +
# ##i##swapon /dev/sda2
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.
 +
 
 +
{{fancywarning|1=
 +
When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of <code>openvz-rhel6-stable</code> are '''not''' compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
==== Montando os filesystems ====
 +
 
 +
Monte os recem-criados filesystems como a seguir, criando <code>/mnt/funtoo</code> como ponto de montagem da instalação:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for <code>/home</code> or anything else:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
If you have <code>/tmp</code> or <code>/var/tmp</code> on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp
 +
</console>

Revision as of 13:58, December 6, 2014

Particionamento

Prepare o Disco Rígido

Introdução

Em tempos passados, só havia um jeito de bootar o computador compatível com a arquitetura PC. Todos os nossos desktops e servidores tinham uma BIOS padrão, todos os nossos hard drives utilizavam Master Boot Records, e eram particionados utilizando esquema de partição MBR. E nós gostávamos disso daquele jeito mesmo!

Então, depois veio os EFI e UEFI, que são firmware em novo-estilo projetados para bootar sistemas, junto a tabelas de partição GPT para suportar discos maiores que 2.2TB. Tudo repentino, nós tínhamos uma variedade de opções para bootar os sistemas boot Linux, tornando o que uma vez era um método único de encaixe de tudo (one-method-fits-all) aproximar-se á algo muito mais complexo.

Vamos parar por um momento para rever as opções de boot disponíveis para você. Esse pequeno Guia utiliza, e recomenda, o método da BIOS da velha guarda bootando e usando um MBR. Funciona. Não há nada de errado com ele. Se seu disco é do tamanho de 2TB ou menor, ele não vai impedir que você use toda a capacidade do seu disco, também.

Mas, há alguns situações onde o método da não é satisfatório. Se você obtiver um disco de tamando superior à 2TB, então partições MBR não o permitirão acessar todo o seu armazenamento (storage). Então essa é uma rasão. Outra rasão é que há Another reason is that there are some so-called "PC" systems out there that don't support BIOS booting anymore, and force you to use UEFI to boot. So, out of compassion for people who fall into this predicament, this Install Guide documents UEFI booting too.

Our recommendation is still to go old-school unless you have reason not to. We call this method the BIOS + GRUB (MBR) method. It's the traditional method of setting up a PC-compatible system to boot Linux.

If you need to use UEFI to boot, we recommend not using the MBR at all for booting, as some systems support this, but others don't. Instead, we recommend using UEFI to boot GRUB, which in turn will load Linux. We refer to this method as the UEFI + GRUB (GPT) method.

And yes, there are even more methods, some of which are documented on the Boot Methods page. We used to recommend a BIOS + GRUB (GPT) method but it is not consistently supported across a wide variety of hardware.

The big question is -- which boot method should you use? Here's how to tell.

Principle 1 - Old School
If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial light blue menu, you are booting the CD using the BIOS, and it's likely that you can thus boot Funtoo Linux using the BIOS. So, go old-school and use BIOS booting, unless you have some reason to use UEFI, such as having a >2.2TB system disk. In that case, see Principle 2, as your system may also support UEFI booting.
Principle 2 - New School
If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial black and white menu -- congratulations, your system is configured to support UEFI booting. This means that you are ready to install Funtoo Linux to boot via UEFI. Your system may still support BIOS booting, but just be trying UEFI first. You can poke around in your BIOS boot configuration and play with this.
What's the Big Difference between Old School and New School?
Here's the deal. If you go with old-school MBR partitions, your /boot partition will be an ext2 filesystem, and you'll use fdisk to create your MBR partitions. If you go with new-school GPT partitions and UEFI booting, your /boot partition will be a vfat filesystem, because this is what UEFI is able to read, and you will use gdisk to create your GPT partitions. And you'll install GRUB a bit differently. That's about all it comes down to, in case you were curious.

Note

Some motherboards may appear to support UEFI, but don't. Do your research. For example, the Award BIOS in my Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 has an option to enable UEFI boot for CD/DVD. This is not sufficient for enabling UEFI boot for hard drives and installing Funtoo Linux. UEFI must be supported for both removable media (so you can boot System Rescue CD using UEFI) as well as fixed media (so you can boot your new Funtoo Linux installation.) It turns out that later revisions of this board (rev 3.0) have a new BIOS that fully supports UEFI boot. This may point to a third principle -- know thy hardware.

Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.

Preparation

First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that /dev/sda is the disk that you want to partition:

# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: gpt


#         Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 1         2048   1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem

Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using sgdisk:

Warning

This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are strongly cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.

# sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda

Creating new GPT entries.
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
other utilities.

This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:

***************************************************************
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
in memory. 
***************************************************************
Partitioning

Now we will use fdisk to create the MBR partition table and partitions:

# fdisk /dev/sda

Within fdisk, follow these steps:

Empty the partition table:

Command (m for help): o ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (1-4, default 1): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +128M ↵

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (2-4, default 2): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +2G ↵
Command (m for help): t ↵ 
Partition number (1,2, default 2): 
Hex code (type L to list all codes): 82 ↵

Create the root partition:

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (3,4, default 3): 
First sector: 
Last sector: 

Verify the partition table:

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6

Device    Boot     Start       End    Blocks  Id System
/dev/sda1           2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
/dev/sda2         264192   4458495   2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux

Write the parition table to disk:

Command (m for help): w

Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.

Note

You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to Creating filesystems.

New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.

The gdisk commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start gdisk:

# gdisk

Within gdisk, follow these steps:

Create a new empty partition table (This will erase all data on the disk when saved):

Command: o ↵
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
Proceed? (Y/N): y ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 1 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +500M ↵
Hex Code: 

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 2 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +4G ↵
Hex Code: 8200 ↵

Create Partition 3 (root):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 3 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector:  (for rest of disk)
Hex Code: 

Along the way, you can type "p" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "d" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "w" to write your configuration to disk:

Write Partition Table To Disk:

Command: w ↵
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): Y ↵

The partition table will now be written to disk and gdisk will close.

Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following block devices under Linux:

  • /dev/sda1, which will be used to hold the /boot filesystem,
  • /dev/sda2, which will be used for swap space, and
  • /dev/sda3, which will hold your root filesystem.

Creating filesystems

Note

This section covers both BIOS and UEFI installs. Don't skip it!

Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem metadata. This process is known as creating a filesystem on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.

Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:

# mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1

If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:

# mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1

Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.

You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the mkswap command. Then we'll run the swapon command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:

# mkswap /dev/sda2
# swapon /dev/sda2

Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:

# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3

...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:

# mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3

Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.

Warning

When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of openvz-rhel6-stable are not compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.

Montando os filesystems

Monte os recem-criados filesystems como a seguir, criando /mnt/funtoo como ponto de montagem da instalação:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo
# mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
# mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot

Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for /home or anything else:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
# mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home

If you have /tmp or /var/tmp on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:

# chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp