Difference between pages "The Gentoo.org Redesign, Part 1" and "Install/ru/Partitioning"

(Difference between pages)
(Created page with "{{Article |Subtitle=A site reborn |Summary=Have you ever woken up one morning and suddenly realized that your cute little personal development Web site isn't really that great...")
 
(Введение)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Article
+
<noinclude>
|Subtitle=A site reborn
+
{{InstallPart|процесс разбиения диска и создания файловых систем}}
|Summary=Have you ever woken up one morning and suddenly realized that your cute little personal development Web site isn't really that great? If so, you're in good company. In this series, Daniel Robbins shares his experiences as he redesigns the www.gentoo.org Web site using technologies like XML, XSLT, and Python. Along the way, you may find some excellent approaches to use for your next Web site redesign. In this article, Daniel creates a user-centric action plan and introduces pytext, an embedded Python interpreter.
+
</noinclude>
|Author=Drobbins
+
=== Подготовка жесткого диска ===
}}
+
== An unruly horde ==
+
  
Fellow software developer, may I ask you a question? Why is it that although many of us are intimately familiar with Web technologies such as HTML, CGI, Perl, Python, Java technology, and XML, our very own Web sites -- the ones devoted to our precious development projects -- look like they were thrown together by an unruly horde of hyperactive 12-year-olds? Why, oh why, is this so?
+
В этой части  мы научимся различным способам установки Funtoo Linux -- и загрузки с -- жесткий диск.
  
Could it be because most of the time, we've left our Web site out to rot while we squander our precious time hacking away on our free software projects? The answer, at least in my case, is a most definite "Yes."
+
==== Введение ====
  
When I'm not writing articles for IBM developerWorks or being a new dad, I'm feverishly working on the next release of Gentoo Linux, along with my skilled team of volunteers. And, yes, Gentoo Linux has its own Web site (see Resources). As of right now (March 2001), our Web site isn't that special; that's because we don't spend much time working on it because we're generally engrossed in improving Gentoo Linux itself. Sure, our site does have several admittedly cute logos that I whipped up using Xara X (see Resources), but when you look past the eye candy, our site leaves a lot to be desired. Maybe yours does too. If so, I have one thing to say to you -- welcome to the club.
+
В прежние времена существовал лишь один способ загрузить PC-совместимый компьютер. Все наши дектопы и сервера имели стандартный PC BIOS, все наши харды использовали MBR и были разбиты используя схему разбивки MBR. Вот как это все было и нам это нравилось!
  
== www.gentoo.org ==
+
Затем появились EFI и UEFI, встроенные программы нового образца наряду со схемой разбивки GPT, поддерживающая диски размером более 2.2TБ. Неожиданно, нам стали доступны различные способы установки и загрузки Линукс систем . То, что было единым методом, стало чем-то более сложным.
  
In our case, our Web site dilemma exists because our project has been growing, and our Web site hasn't. Now that Gentoo Linux is approaching the 1.0 release (when it'll be officially ready for non-developers) and is growing in popularity, we need to start seriously looking at how our Web site can better serve its users. Here's a snapshot of www.gentoo.org:
+
Let's take a moment to review the options available to you for configuring a hard drive to boot Funtoo Linux. This Install Guide uses, and recommends, the old-school method of BIOS booting and using an MBR. It works and (except for rare cases) is universally supported. There's nothing wrong with it. If your system disk is 2TB or smaller in size, it won't prevent you from using all of your disk's capacity, either.
  
<div style="margin: 10px;">[[File:L-redesign-01.gif|frame|class=img-responsive|The current (March 2001) state of affairs at www.gentoo.org]]</div>
+
But, there are some situations where the old-school method isn't optimal. If you have a system disk >2TB in size, then MBR partitions won't allow you to access all your storage. So that's one reason. Another reason is that there are some so-called "PC" systems out there that don't support BIOS booting anymore, and force you to use UEFI to boot. So, out of compassion for people who fall into this predicament, this Install Guide documents UEFI booting too.
  
As you can see, we have all the bare essentials -- a description of Gentoo Linux, a features list, a daily Changelog (automatically updated thanks to Python), and a bunch of important links (to the download sites, to our mailing list sign-up pages, and to cvsWeb). We also have links to three documentation resources -- the Gentoo Linux Install Guide and Development Guides, and Christian Zander's NVIDIA Troubleshooting Guide.
+
Our recommendation is still to go old-school unless you have reason not to. The boot loader we will be using to load the Linux kernel in this guide is called GRUB, so we call this method the '''BIOS + GRUB (MBR)''' method. It's the traditional method of setting up a PC-compatible system to boot Linux.
  
However, while the site seems O.K., we're missing a lot of things. The most obvious is documentation -- our installation and development guides need a lot of work. And then we need to add an FAQ, new links, new user information...the list is endless.
+
If you need to use UEFI to boot, we recommend not using the MBR at all for booting, as some systems support this, but others don't. Instead, we recommend using UEFI to boot GRUB, which in turn will load Linux. We refer to this method as the '''UEFI + GRUB (GPT)''' method.
  
== Content vs. display ==
+
And yes, there are even more methods, some of which are documented on the [[Boot Methods]] page. We used to recommend a '''BIOS + GRUB (GPT)''' method but it is not consistently supported across a wide variety of hardware.
  
And now we come to our second problem. Right now, all of our work is done in raw HTML; I hack away at the index.html file until it looks O.K. Even worse, our Web documentation is written in raw HTML. This isn't a good thing from a development perspective because our raw content (consisting of paragraphs, sections, chapters) is garbled together with a bunch of display-related HTML tags. This, of course, makes it difficult to change both the content and the look of our site. While this approach has worked so far, it is bound to cause problems as our site continues to grow.
+
'''The big question is -- which boot method should you use?''' Here's how to tell.
  
Clearly, we need to be using better technologies behind the scenes. Instead of using HTML directly, we need to start using things like XML, XSLT, and Python. The goal is to automate as much as possible so that we can add and expand our site with ease. If we do our job well, even major future changes to our site should be relatively painless.
+
;Principle 1 - Old School: If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial light blue menu, you are booting the CD using the BIOS, and it's likely that you can thus boot Funtoo Linux using the BIOS. So, go old-school and use BIOS booting, ''unless'' you have some reason to use UEFI, such as having a >2.2TB system disk. In that case, see Principle 2, as your system may also support UEFI booting.
  
== A strategy! ==
+
;Principle 2 - New School: If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial black and white menu -- congratulations, your system is configured to support UEFI booting. This means that you are ready to install Funtoo Linux to boot via UEFI. Your system may still support BIOS booting, but just be trying UEFI first. You can poke around in your BIOS boot configuration and play with this.
  
It was clear that we had a lot of work ahead of us. In fact, there was so much to be done that I didn't know where to begin. Just as I was trying to sort out everything in my head, I came across Laura Wonnacott's "Site Savvy" InfoWorld column (see Resources). In it, she explained the concept of "user-centric" design -- how to improve a Web site while keeping the needs of your target audience (in this case, Gentoo Linux users and developers) in focus. Reading the article and taking a look at the "Handbook of User-Centered Design" link from the article helped me to formulate a strategy -- an action plan -- for the redesign:
+
;What's the Big Difference between Old School and New School?: Here's the deal. If you go with old-school MBR partitions, your <code>/boot</code> partition will be an ext2 filesystem, and you'll use <code>fdisk</code> to create your MBR partitions. If you go with new-school GPT partitions and UEFI booting, your <code>/boot</code> partition will be a vfat filesystem, because this is what UEFI is able to read, and you will use <code>gdisk</code> to create your GPT partitions. And you'll install GRUB a bit differently. That's about all it comes down to, in case you were curious.
  
# First, clearly define the official goal of the Web site -- in writing. What's it there for, and what's it supposed to do?
+
;Also Note: To install Funtoo Linux to boot via the New School UEFI method, you must boot System Rescue CD using UEFI -- and see an initial black and white screen. Otherwise, UEFI will not be active and you will not be able to set it up!
#  Identify the different categories of users who will be using your site -- your target audience. Rank them in order of priority: Which ones are most important to you?
+
# Set up a system for getting feedback from your target audience, so they can let you know what you're doing right and wrong.
+
# Evaluate the feedback, and use it to determine what parts of the site need to be improved or redesigned. Tackle high-priority sections first.
+
# Once you've selected the part of the site to improve, get to work! During your implementation, make sure that the content and design of the new section caters specifically to the needs of your target audience and fixes all known deficiencies.
+
# When the section redesign is complete, add it to your live site, even if it has a look that's markedly different from your current site. This way, your users can begin benefitting from the newly redesigned section immediately. If there's a problem with the redesign, you'll get user feedback more quickly. Finally, making incremental improvements to your site (rather than revamping the whole site and then rolling it out all at once -- surprise!) will help prevent your users from feeling alienated by your (possibly dramatic) site changes.
+
#  After completing step 6, jump to step 4 and repeat.
+
  
== The mission statement ==
+
{{Note|'''Some motherboards may appear to support UEFI, but don't.''' Do your research. For example, the Award BIOS in my Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 has an option to enable UEFI boot for CD/DVD. '''This is not sufficient for enabling UEFI boot for hard drives and installing Funtoo Linux.''' UEFI must be supported for both removable media (so you can boot System Rescue CD using UEFI) as well as fixed media (so you can boot your new Funtoo Linux installation.) It turns out that later revisions of this board (rev 3.0) have a new BIOS that fully supports UEFI boot.  This may point to a third principle -- know thy hardware.}}
  
I was happy to discover that we already had step 3 in place. We had received several e-mail suggestions from visitors to the site, and our developer mailing list also served as a way of exchanging suggestions and comments. However, I had never really completed steps 1 or 2. While the answers may seem obvious, I did find it helpful to actually sit down and write out our mission statement:
+
==== Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method ====
  
www.gentoo.org exists to assist those who use and develop for Gentoo Linux by providing relevant, up-to-date information about Gentoo Linux and Linux in general, focusing on topics related to Gentoo Linux installation, use, administration, and development. As the central hub for all things Gentoo, the site should also feature important news relevant to Gentoo Linux users and developers. In addition to catering to Gentoo Linux users and developers, www.gentoo.org has the secondary purpose of meeting the needs of potential Gentoo Linux users, providing the information they need to decide whether Gentoo Linux is right for them.
+
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, [[#New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method|click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.]]}}
  
== The target audience ==
+
===== Preparation =====
  
So far, so good. Now for step 2 -- defining our target audience:
+
First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that <code>/dev/sda</code> is the disk that you want to partition:
  
www.gentoo.org has three target audiences -- Gentoo Linux developers, users, and potential users. While no one group is absolutely a higher priority than another, right now the needs of Gentoo Linux developers are our highest priority, followed by Gentoo Linux users, and then potential users. This is because Gentoo Linux is currently in a prerelease state. When Gentoo Linux reaches version 1.0, Gentoo Linux users and potential users will also become a priority.
+
<console>
 +
# ##i##fdisk -l /dev/sda
  
== Comments and suggestions ==
+
Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
 +
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 +
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disk label type: gpt
  
O.K., now it's time to evaluate the suggestions and comments we've collected:
 
  
Over the past few months, we've received a number of suggestions from Web site visitors. Overwhelmingly, people are requesting better documentation -- for both developers and users. Several developers have asked if we could create a mailing list that would be devoted exclusively to describing CVS commits.
+
#        Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 +
1        2048  1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem
 +
</console>
  
Interestingly, we've also received a couple of e-mails asking whether Gentoo Linux is a commercial or free product. I'm guessing that because our main logo is inscribed with the name "Gentoo Technologies, Inc." (our legal corporation name), people assume that we have a commercial focus. Modifying our logo so that it reads "Gentoo Linux" and adding small opening paragraph to the main page explaining that we are a free software project should help.
+
Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using <code>sgdisk</code>:
 +
{{fancywarning|This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are '''strongly''' cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.}}
  
== The improvement list ==
+
<console>
 +
# ##i##sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda
  
O.K., now let's turn these suggestions into a list of possible improvements:
+
Creating new GPT entries.
 +
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
 +
other utilities.
 +
</console>
  
* Revamp main page
+
This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:
** Implementation: update logo and add free software blurb
+
** Goal: to clearly state that we are a free software project
+
** Target group: potential users
+
**  Difficulty: medium
+
* Improve basic user documentation
+
**  Implementation: new XML/XSLT system, verbose documentation
+
** Goal: to make it easier for users to install Gentoo Linux
+
** Target group: new users
+
** Difficulty: medium
+
*Improve/create developer documentation
+
** Implementation: new XML/XSLT system, CVS guide, dev guide, Portage guide
+
**  Goal: to help our developers to do a great job
+
** Target group: developers
+
** Difficulty: hard
+
*Add a CVS mailing list
+
** Implementation: use our existing mailman mailing list manager
+
** Goal: to better inform our developers
+
** Target group: developers
+
** Difficulty: easy
+
  
== A selection! ==
+
<console>
 +
***************************************************************
 +
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
 +
in memory.
 +
***************************************************************
 +
</console>
  
Two things leap out from the list, for different reasons. The first is the CVS mailing list -- this one is a no-brainer because it's so easy to implement. Often, it makes sense to implement the easiest changes first so that users can benefit from them right away.
+
===== Partitioning =====
  
The second big thing that leaps out from the list is the need for developer documentation. This is a longer-term project that will require much more work. From my conversations with the other developers, we all appear to be in agreement that some kind of XML/XSL approach is the right solution.
+
Now we will use <code>fdisk</code> to create the MBR partition table and partitions:
  
== The XML/XSL prototype ==
+
<console>
 +
# ##i##fdisk /dev/sda
 +
</console>
  
To help start the process, I developed a prototype XML syntax to be used for all our online documentation. By using this XML syntax (called "guide"), our documentation will be clearly organized into paragraphs, sections, and chapters (using XML tags like <section>, <chapter>, etc.) while remaining free of any display-related tags. To create the HTML for display on our site, I created a prototype set of XSL transforms. By using an XSLT processor such as Sablotron, our guide XML files can be converted into HTML as follows:
+
Within <code>fdisk</code>, follow these steps:
  
devguide.xml + guide.xsl ---XSLT processor---> devguide.html
+
'''Empty the partition table''':
  
The great thing about this XML/XSLT approach is that it separates our raw content (XML) from the display-related information contained in the guide.xsl (XSLT) file. If we ever need to update the look of our Web pages, we simply modify the guide.xsl file and run all our XML through the XSLT processor (Sablotron), creating updated HTML pages. Or, if we need to add a few chapters to the development guide, we can modify devguide.xml. Once we're done, we then run the XML through Sablotron, which then spits out a fully-formatted devguide.html file with several added chapters. Think of XML as the content and XSLT as the display-related formatting macros.
+
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##o ↵
 +
</console>
  
While our entire team is convinced that XML/XSLT is the way to go, we haven't yet agreed upon an official XML syntax. Achim, our development lead, suggested that we use docbook instead of rolling our own XML syntax. However, the prototype guide XML format has helped to start the decision-making process. Because we developers are going to be the ones using the XML/XSL on a daily basis, it's important to choose a solution that we're comfortable with and meets all of our needs. By my next article, I should have a working XML/XSL doc system to show off to you.
+
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
  
== Technology demo: pytext ==
+
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (1-4, default 1): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+128M ↵
 +
</console>
  
For the most part, our current Web site isn't using any new or super-cool technologies that are worth mentioning. However, there's one notable exception -- our tiny pytext embedded Python interpreter.
+
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
  
Like many of you, I'm a huge Python fan and much prefer it over other scripting languages, so when it came time to add some dynamic content to our Web site, I naturally wanted to use Python. And, as you probably know, when coding dynamic HTML content, it's usually much more convenient to embed the language commands inside the HTML, rather than the other way around. Thus, the need for an embedded Python interpreter that can take a document like this:
+
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (2-4, default 2): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+2G ↵
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##t ↵
 +
Partition number (1,2, default 2): ##i## ↵
 +
Hex code (type L to list all codes): ##i##82 ↵
 +
</console>
  
<pre>
+
'''Create the root partition:'''
<p>
+
Yeah, sure; I got some questions:<br>
+
<!--code
+
names=["bob","jimmy","ralph"]
+
items=["socks","lunch","accordion"]
+
for x in items:
+
for y in names:
+
print "Anyone seen",y+"'s",x+"?<br>"
+
-->
+
See, told you so.
+
</pre>
+
  
....and transform it into this:
+
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition type (default p): ##i##↵
 +
Partition number (3,4, default 3): ##i##↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
  
<pre>
+
'''Verify the partition table:'''
<p>
+
Yeah, sure; I got some questions:<br>
+
Anyone seen bob's socks?<br>
+
Anyone seen jimmy's socks?<br>
+
Anyone seen ralph's socks?<br>
+
Anyone seen bob's lunch?<br>
+
Anyone seen jimmy's lunch?<br>
+
Anyone seen ralph's lunch?<br>
+
Anyone seen bob's accordion?<br>
+
Anyone seen jimmy's accordion?<br>
+
Anyone seen ralph's accordion?<br>
+
See, told you so.
+
</pre>
+
  
Here's the source code for pytext:
+
<console>
 +
Command (m for help): ##i##p
  
Code Listing 2.4:  
+
Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
{{file|name=pytext|lang=python|desc=The pytext embedded Python interpreter|body=
+
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
#!/usr/bin/env python2
+
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 +
Disklabel type: dos
 +
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6
  
# pytext 2.1
+
Device    Boot    Start      End    Blocks  Id System
# Copyright 1999-2001 Daniel Robbins
+
/dev/sda1          2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
# Distributed under the GPL
+
/dev/sda2        264192  4458495  2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
 +
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux
 +
</console>
  
import sys
+
'''Write the parition table to disk:'''
  
def runfile(myarg):
+
<console>
  "interprets a text file with embedded elements"
+
Command (m for help): ##i##w
  mylocals={}
+
</console>
  try:
+
      a=open(myarg,'r')
+
  except IOError:
+
      sys.stderr.write("!!! Error opening "+myarg+"!\n")
+
      return
+
  mylines=a.readlines()
+
  a.close()
+
  pos=0
+
  while pos<len(mylines):
+
      if mylines[pos][0:8]=="<!--code":
+
  mycode=""
+
  pos=pos+1
+
  while (pos<len(mylines)) and (mylines[pos][0:3]!="-->"):
+
      mycode=mycode+mylines[pos]
+
      pos=pos+1
+
  exec(mycode,globals(),mylocals)
+
      else:
+
  sys.stdout.write(mylines[pos])
+
      pos=pos+1
+
  
if len(sys.argv)>1:
+
Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.
  for x in sys.argv[1:]:
+
      runfile(x)
+
  sys.exit(0)
+
else:
+
  sys.stderr.write
+
    ("pytext 2.1 -- Copyright 1999-2001 Daniel Robbins. ")
+
  sys.stderr.write
+
    ("Distributed under the\nGNU Public License\n\n")
+
  sys.stderr.write
+
    ("Usage: "+sys.argv[0]+" file0 [file1]...\n")
+
  sys.exit(1)
+
}}
+
  
== How pytext works ==
+
{{Note|You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to [[#Creating filesystems|Creating filesystems]].}}
  
Here's how it works. It scans each input line, and most of the time, each input line is simply echoed to stdout. However, if pytext encounters a line beginning with <!--code, then the contents of every line up to the first line beginning with --> are appended to a string called mycode. Pytext then executes the mycode string using the built-in exec() function, effectively creating an embedded Python interpreter.
+
==== New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method ====
  
There's something really beautiful about this particular implementation -- we call exec() in such a way that all modifications to the global and local namespaces are saved. This makes it possible to import a module or define a variable in one embedded block, and then access this previously-created object in a later block, as this example clearly demonstrates:
+
{{Note|Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.}}
  
<pre>
+
The <tt>gdisk</tt> commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start <code>gdisk</code>:
<!--code
+
import os
+
foo=23
+
-->
+
  
Hello
+
<console>
 +
# ##i##gdisk
 +
</console>
  
<!--code
+
Within <tt>gdisk</tt>, follow these steps:
print foo
+
if os.path.exists("/tmp/mytmpfile"):
+
print "it exists"
+
else:
+
print "I don't see it"
+
-->
+
</pre>
+
  
Handy, eh? pytext serves is an excellent demonstration of the power of Python, and is an extremely useful tool for Python fans. For our current site, we call pytext from a cron job, using it to periodically generate the HTML code for our main page Changelog:
+
'''Create a new empty partition table''' (This ''will'' erase all data on the disk when saved):
  
 
<console>
 
<console>
$ ##i##pytext index.ehtml > index.html
+
Command: ##i##o ↵
 +
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
 +
Proceed? (Y/N): ##i##y ↵
 
</console>
 
</console>
  
That's it for now; I'll see you next time when we'll take a look at the first stage of the www.gentoo.org redesign!
+
'''Create Partition 1''' (boot):
{{ArticleFooter}}
+
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##1 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+500M ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 2''' (swap):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##2 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##+4G ↵
 +
Hex Code: ##i##8200 ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
'''Create Partition 3''' (root):
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##n ↵
 +
Partition Number: ##i##3 ↵
 +
First sector: ##i##↵
 +
Last sector: ##i##↵##!i## (for rest of disk)
 +
Hex Code: ##i##↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Along the way, you can type "<tt>p</tt>" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "<tt>d</tt>" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "<tt>w</tt>" to write your configuration to disk:
 +
 
 +
'''Write Partition Table To Disk''':
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
Command: ##i##w ↵
 +
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): ##i##Y ↵
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
The partition table will now be written to disk and <tt>gdisk</tt> will close.
 +
 
 +
Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following ''block devices'' under Linux:
 +
 
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda1</tt>, which will be used to hold the <tt>/boot</tt> filesystem,
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda2</tt>, which will be used for swap space, and
 +
* <tt>/dev/sda3</tt>, which will hold your root filesystem.
 +
 
 +
==== Creating filesystems ====
 +
 
 +
{{Note|This section covers both BIOS ''and'' UEFI installs. Don't skip it!}}
 +
 
 +
Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem ''metadata''. This process is known as ''creating a filesystem'' on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.
 +
 
 +
Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.
 +
 
 +
You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the <code>mkswap</code> command. Then we'll run the <code>swapon</code> command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkswap /dev/sda2
 +
# ##i##swapon /dev/sda2
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.
 +
 
 +
{{fancywarning|1=
 +
When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of <code>openvz-rhel6-stable</code> are '''not''' compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
==== Mounting filesystems ====
 +
 
 +
Mount the newly-created filesystems as follows, creating <code>/mnt/funtoo</code> as the installation mount point:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for <code>/home</code> or anything else:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
 +
# ##i##mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home
 +
</console>
 +
 
 +
If you have <code>/tmp</code> or <code>/var/tmp</code> on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:
 +
 
 +
<console>
 +
# ##i##chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp
 +
</console>

Revision as of 13:31, January 5, 2015


Note

This is a template that is used as part of the Installation instructions which covers: процесс разбиения диска и создания файловых систем. Templates are being used to allow multiple variant install guides that use most of the same re-usable parts.


Подготовка жесткого диска

В этой части мы научимся различным способам установки Funtoo Linux -- и загрузки с -- жесткий диск.

Введение

В прежние времена существовал лишь один способ загрузить PC-совместимый компьютер. Все наши дектопы и сервера имели стандартный PC BIOS, все наши харды использовали MBR и были разбиты используя схему разбивки MBR. Вот как это все было и нам это нравилось!

Затем появились EFI и UEFI, встроенные программы нового образца наряду со схемой разбивки GPT, поддерживающая диски размером более 2.2TБ. Неожиданно, нам стали доступны различные способы установки и загрузки Линукс систем . То, что было единым методом, стало чем-то более сложным.

Let's take a moment to review the options available to you for configuring a hard drive to boot Funtoo Linux. This Install Guide uses, and recommends, the old-school method of BIOS booting and using an MBR. It works and (except for rare cases) is universally supported. There's nothing wrong with it. If your system disk is 2TB or smaller in size, it won't prevent you from using all of your disk's capacity, either.

But, there are some situations where the old-school method isn't optimal. If you have a system disk >2TB in size, then MBR partitions won't allow you to access all your storage. So that's one reason. Another reason is that there are some so-called "PC" systems out there that don't support BIOS booting anymore, and force you to use UEFI to boot. So, out of compassion for people who fall into this predicament, this Install Guide documents UEFI booting too.

Our recommendation is still to go old-school unless you have reason not to. The boot loader we will be using to load the Linux kernel in this guide is called GRUB, so we call this method the BIOS + GRUB (MBR) method. It's the traditional method of setting up a PC-compatible system to boot Linux.

If you need to use UEFI to boot, we recommend not using the MBR at all for booting, as some systems support this, but others don't. Instead, we recommend using UEFI to boot GRUB, which in turn will load Linux. We refer to this method as the UEFI + GRUB (GPT) method.

And yes, there are even more methods, some of which are documented on the Boot Methods page. We used to recommend a BIOS + GRUB (GPT) method but it is not consistently supported across a wide variety of hardware.

The big question is -- which boot method should you use? Here's how to tell.

Principle 1 - Old School
If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial light blue menu, you are booting the CD using the BIOS, and it's likely that you can thus boot Funtoo Linux using the BIOS. So, go old-school and use BIOS booting, unless you have some reason to use UEFI, such as having a >2.2TB system disk. In that case, see Principle 2, as your system may also support UEFI booting.
Principle 2 - New School
If you can reliably boot System Rescue CD and it shows you an initial black and white menu -- congratulations, your system is configured to support UEFI booting. This means that you are ready to install Funtoo Linux to boot via UEFI. Your system may still support BIOS booting, but just be trying UEFI first. You can poke around in your BIOS boot configuration and play with this.
What's the Big Difference between Old School and New School?
Here's the deal. If you go with old-school MBR partitions, your /boot partition will be an ext2 filesystem, and you'll use fdisk to create your MBR partitions. If you go with new-school GPT partitions and UEFI booting, your /boot partition will be a vfat filesystem, because this is what UEFI is able to read, and you will use gdisk to create your GPT partitions. And you'll install GRUB a bit differently. That's about all it comes down to, in case you were curious.
Also Note
To install Funtoo Linux to boot via the New School UEFI method, you must boot System Rescue CD using UEFI -- and see an initial black and white screen. Otherwise, UEFI will not be active and you will not be able to set it up!
Note

Some motherboards may appear to support UEFI, but don't. Do your research. For example, the Award BIOS in my Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 rev 1.1 has an option to enable UEFI boot for CD/DVD. This is not sufficient for enabling UEFI boot for hard drives and installing Funtoo Linux. UEFI must be supported for both removable media (so you can boot System Rescue CD using UEFI) as well as fixed media (so you can boot your new Funtoo Linux installation.) It turns out that later revisions of this board (rev 3.0) have a new BIOS that fully supports UEFI boot. This may point to a third principle -- know thy hardware.

Old-School (BIOS/MBR) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using your BIOS, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was light blue. If you're going to use the new-school method, click here to jump down to UEFI/GPT.

Preparation

First, it's a good idea to make sure that you've found the correct hard disk to partition. Try this command and verify that /dev/sda is the disk that you want to partition:

# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 640.1 GB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk label type: gpt


#         Start          End    Size  Type            Name
 1         2048   1250263694  596.2G  Linux filesyste Linux filesystem

Now, it's recommended that you erase any existing MBR or GPT partition tables on the disk, which could confuse the system's BIOS at boot time. We do this using sgdisk:

Warning

This will make any existing partitions inaccessible! You are strongly cautioned and advised to backup any critical data before proceeding.

# sgdisk --zap-all /dev/sda

Creating new GPT entries.
GPT data structures destroyed! You may now partition the disk using fdisk or
other utilities.

This output is also nothing to worry about, as the command still succeded:

***************************************************************
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
in memory. 
***************************************************************
Partitioning

Now we will use fdisk to create the MBR partition table and partitions:

# fdisk /dev/sda

Within fdisk, follow these steps:

Empty the partition table:

Command (m for help): o ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (1-4, default 1): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +128M ↵

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (2-4, default 2): 
First sector: 
Last sector: +2G ↵
Command (m for help): t ↵ 
Partition number (1,2, default 2): 
Hex code (type L to list all codes): 82 ↵

Create the root partition:

Command (m for help): n ↵
Partition type (default p): 
Partition number (3,4, default 3): 
First sector: 
Last sector: 

Verify the partition table:

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sda: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x82abc9a6

Device    Boot     Start       End    Blocks  Id System
/dev/sda1           2048    264191    131072  83 Linux
/dev/sda2         264192   4458495   2097152  82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda3        4458496 625142447 310341976  83 Linux

Write the parition table to disk:

Command (m for help): w

Your new MBR partition table will now be written to your system disk.

Note

You're done with partitioning! Now, jump over to Creating filesystems.

New-School (UEFI/GPT) Method

Note

Use this method if you are booting using UEFI, and if your System Rescue CD initial boot menu was black and white. If it was light blue, this method will not work.

The gdisk commands to create a GPT partition table are as follows. Adapt sizes as necessary, although these defaults will work for most users. Start gdisk:

# gdisk

Within gdisk, follow these steps:

Create a new empty partition table (This will erase all data on the disk when saved):

Command: o ↵
This option deletes all partitions and creates a new protective MBR.
Proceed? (Y/N): y ↵

Create Partition 1 (boot):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 1 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +500M ↵
Hex Code: 

Create Partition 2 (swap):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 2 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector: +4G ↵
Hex Code: 8200 ↵

Create Partition 3 (root):

Command: n ↵
Partition Number: 3 ↵
First sector: 
Last sector:  (for rest of disk)
Hex Code: 

Along the way, you can type "p" and hit Enter to view your current partition table. If you make a mistake, you can type "d" to delete an existing partition that you created. When you are satisfied with your partition setup, type "w" to write your configuration to disk:

Write Partition Table To Disk:

Command: w ↵
Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): Y ↵

The partition table will now be written to disk and gdisk will close.

Now, your GPT/GUID partitions have been created, and will show up as the following block devices under Linux:

  • /dev/sda1, which will be used to hold the /boot filesystem,
  • /dev/sda2, which will be used for swap space, and
  • /dev/sda3, which will hold your root filesystem.

Creating filesystems

Note

This section covers both BIOS and UEFI installs. Don't skip it!

Before your newly-created partitions can be used, the block devices need to be initialized with filesystem metadata. This process is known as creating a filesystem on the block devices. After filesystems are created on the block devices, they can be mounted and used to store files.

Let's keep this simple. Are you using old-school MBR partitions? If so, let's create an ext2 filesystem on /dev/sda1:

# mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1

If you're using new-school GPT partitions for UEFI, you'll want to create a vfat filesystem on /dev/sda1, because this is what UEFI is able to read:

# mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1

Now, let's create a swap partition. This partition will be used as disk-based virtual memory for your Funtoo Linux system.

You will not create a filesystem on your swap partition, since it is not used to store files. But it is necessary to initialize it using the mkswap command. Then we'll run the swapon command to make your newly-initialized swap space immediately active within the live CD environment, in case it is needed during the rest of the install process:

# mkswap /dev/sda2
# swapon /dev/sda2

Now, we need to create a root filesystem. This is where Funtoo Linux will live. We generally recommend ext4 or XFS root filesystems. If you're not sure, choose ext4. Here's how to create a root ext4 filesystem:

# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda3

...and here's how to create an XFS root filesystem, if you choose to use XFS:

# mkfs.xfs /dev/sda3

Your filesystems (and swap) have all now been initialized, so that that can be mounted (attached to your existing directory heirarchy) and used to store files. We are ready to begin installing Funtoo Linux on these brand-new filesystems.

Warning

When deploying an OpenVZ host, please use ext4 exclusively. The Parallels development team tests extensively with ext4, and modern versions of openvz-rhel6-stable are not compatible with XFS, and you may experience kernel bugs.

Mounting filesystems

Mount the newly-created filesystems as follows, creating /mnt/funtoo as the installation mount point:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo
# mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/funtoo
# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/boot
# mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/funtoo/boot

Optionally, if you have a separate filesystem for /home or anything else:

# mkdir /mnt/funtoo/home
# mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/funtoo/home

If you have /tmp or /var/tmp on a separate filesystem, be sure to change the permissions of the mount point to be globally-writeable after mounting, as follows:

# chmod 1777 /mnt/funtoo/tmp