Difference between pages "UEFI Install Guide" and "Install/Stage3/pt-br"

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This tutorial will show you how to install Funtoo on a UEFI system. UEFI, also known as the [[Wikipedia:Unified Extensible Firmware Interface|Unified Extensible Firmware Interface]], is a new firmware interface that is used on some newer computers as a replacement for the traditional PC BIOS. It has an integrated boot loader, so setting up booting is different.
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=== Instalndo o Stage 3 tarball ===
  
This tutorial is meant to be an "overlay" over the Regular Funtoo Installation. Follow the normal installation and only follow steps in this tutorial when dealing with partitioning and configuring the boot loader (GRUB). All steps are otherwise identical to the regular installation process.
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Depois de criar os  filesystems, o próximo passo é baixar o Stage 3 tarball inicial. O Stage 3 é um sistema pré-compiled utilizado como um ponto inicial para instalar o Funtoo Linux. Carregue um dos seguintes URLs em outra janela do navegador:
  
== What Are We Doing? ==
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{{MirrorList}}
  
This guide will show you how to set up your UEFI system to load the GRUB boot loader, which will then load your Funtoo Linux kernel and initramfs. This is the "UEFI + GRUB" method as described on the [[Boot Methods]] page.
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Agora, vamos navegar pelos diretórios nos mirrors para encontrar o build apropriado do  Funtoo Linux para você.
  
== First Steps ==
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==== Qual Build? ====
  
To install Funtoo Linux on a UEFI system, first you need to boot SysRescueCD in UEFI mode. To do this, enable UEFI in your BIOS, and if necessary disable legacy booting. After some fiddling, you should be able to boot SysRescueCD and get a black and white text menu instead of the traditional aqua/cyan-colored menu. The black and white menu indicates that you booted SysRescueCD in UEFI mode. Once you've accomplished this, you're ready to continue with your Funtoo Linux installation and partition your drive. See below for details.
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'''Se não estiver certo, escolha <code>funtoo-current</code>.'''
  
'''If the <tt>/sys/firmware/efi</tt> directory exists, then you have successfully booted in EFI mode and will be able to configure your Funtoo system to boot in EFI mode. If the directory doesn't exist, fix this first. It is a requirement for setting up EFI booting.'''
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Funtoo Linux possui vários 'builds' diferentes, ou variantes. Here is a list of the various builds that are available, and what their distinctive features are:
  
== Partitioning ==
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{{TableStart}}
 +
<tr><th class="info">Build</th><th class="info">Description</th></tr>
 +
<tr><td><code>funtoo-current</code></td><td>The most commonly-selected build of Funtoo Linux. Receives rapid updates and preferred by desktop users.</td></tr>
 +
<tr><td><code>funtoo-current-hardened</code></td><td>Same package set as <code>funtoo-current</code>, but with a hardened, exploit-resistant toolchain.</td></tr>
 +
<tr><td><code>funtoo-stable</code></td><td>Emphasizes less-frequent package updates and trusted, reliable versions of packages over the latest versions.</td></tr>
 +
{{TableEnd}}
  
To set up your partitions for UEFI booting, you will create a ~500MB FAT32 partition on <tt>/dev/sda1</tt>, and set it to type <tt>EF00</tt> using <tt>gdisk</tt>.  
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If you want to read more about this, have a look at [[Funtoo_Linux#What_are_the_differences_between_.27stable.27.2C_.27current.27_and_.27experimental.27_.3F|Differences between stable, current and experimental]].
  
<console>
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==== What Architecture?  ====
Command: ##i##n ↵
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Partition Number: ##i##1 ↵
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First sector: ##i##↵
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Last sector: ##i##+500M ↵
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Hex Code: ##i##EF00
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</console>
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This partition will serve as your Funtoo <tt>/boot</tt> filesystem as well as the partition that the UEFI firmware can read to load GRUB. Then you will set up swap on <tt>/dev/sda2</tt> and your root filesystem on <tt>/dev/sda3</tt>. To create the FAT32 filesystem, type:
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'''If you're not sure, pick <code>x86-64bit</code>, or possibly <code>pure64</code> for server systems.'''
  
<console>
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For PC-compatible systems, the following choices are available:
# ##i##mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sda1
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</console>
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Your <tt>/etc/fstab</tt> entry for this filesystem will also differ, and will look like this:
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{{TableStart}}
 +
<tr><th class="info">Architecture</th><th class="info">Description</th></tr>
 +
<tr><td><code>x86-64bit</code></td><td>For modern 64-bit processors. Uses new 64-bit instructions and address space. Maintains 32-bit compatibility with multilib.</td></tr>
 +
<tr><td><code>pure64</code></td><td>For modern 64-bit processors but with no support for 32-bit compatibility.</td></tr>
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<tr><td><code>x86-32bit</code></td><td>For older 32-bit systems such as Athlon XP, Pentium 4, or earlier Atom.</td></tr>
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{{TableEnd}}
  
<pre>
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==== Your SubArch ====
/dev/sda1 /boot vfat noatime 1 2
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</pre>
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== Kernel ==
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Inside <code>/funtoo-current/x86-64bit/</code> on one of our mirrors, you'll see a bunch of directories for various ''subarches'' of Funtoo Linux. Subarches are builds of Funtoo Linux that are designed to run on a particular type of CPU, to offer the best possible performance. They also take advantage of the instruction sets available for each CPU.
  
=== VFAT ===
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If you are using an AMD-based CPU, download a stage3 from <code>generic_64</code>, <code>amd64-k8</code>, <code>amd64-k10</code>, <code>amd64-bulldozer</code>, <code>amd64-piledriver</code>, <code>amd64-steamroller</code> or <code>amd64-jaguar</code>.  See [[Subarches#64-bit AMD Processors|our list of 64-bit AMD subarches]] for help figuring out which one is best for you.
  
Make sure you add VFAT support to your kernel if you are building it manually.
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If you are using an Intel-based CPU, download a stage3 from <code>generic_64</code>, <code>atom_64</code>, <code>core2_64</code> or <code>corei7</code>. Note that <code>corei7</code> is ideal for any modern Intel processor, including Core i3 and Core i5, and many Xeons.  [[Subarches#64-bit Intel Processors|our list of 64-bit Intel subarches]] for help figuring out which one is best for you.
  
=== EFI Framebuffer ===
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If you are using a 32-bit CPU, download a stage3 from <code>generic_32</code>, <code>i686</code>, <code>core2_32</code>, <code>atom_32</code> or <code>athlon-xp</code>.
  
If you have the following option enabled in your kernel, then uvesafb and efifb will not be able to detect the framebuffer:
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==== Setting the Date ====
  
{{kernelop|title=Bus options (PCI etc.)|desc=
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{{fancyimportant|If your system's date and time are too far off (typically by months or years,) then it may prevent Portage from properly downloading source tarballs. This is because some of our sources are downloaded via HTTPS, which use SSL certificates and are marked with an activation and expiration date. However, if you system time is relatively close to correct, you can probably skip this step for now.}}
    [*] Mark VGA/VBE/EFI FB as generic system framebuffer (NEW)
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}}
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If you have that option enabled, ''you must also enable'':
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Now is a good time to verify the date and time are correctly set to UTC. Use the <code>date</code> command to verify the date and time:
  
{{kernelop|title=Device Drivers,Graphics support,Frame buffer Devices,Support for frame buffer devices|desc=
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<console>
    [*]  Simple framebuffer support
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# ##i##date
}}
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Fri Jul 15 19:47:18 UTC 2011
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</console>
  
This is the preferred method of using the EFI framebuffer, the efifb and uvesafb drivers will be used as a fallback if the above is not compatible.
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If the date and/or time need to be corrected, do so using <code>date MMDDhhmmYYYY</code>, keeping in mind <code>hhmm</code> are in 24-hour format. The example below changes the date and time to "July 16th, 2011 @ 8:00PM" UTC:
  
== Boot Loader ==
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<console>
 +
# ##i##date 071620002011
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Fri Jul 16 20:00:00 UTC 2011
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</console>
  
=== Emerging GRUB ===
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Uma vez que você tenha definido o sistema de horário (system clock), é uma boa ideia copiar o horário para o sistema de horas do seu hardware (hardware clock), assim ele persiste nos reboots:
  
You will still use GRUB as a boot loader, but before emerging grub, you will need to enable EFI booting. To do this,
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<console>
add the following line to <tt>/etc/portage/make.conf</tt>:
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# ##i##hwclock --systohc
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</console>
  
<pre>
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==== Baixe o Stage3 ====
GRUB_PLATFORMS="efi-64"
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Uma vez que você está no root filesystem do seu Funtoo Linux, utilize <code>wget</code> para baixar o Stage 3 tarball que você escolheu utilizar como base para o seu novo sistema Funtoo Linux. Ele deve se salvo no direorio <code>/mnt/funtoo</code> como a seguir:
</pre>
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Then, <tt>emerge grub</tt>. You will notice <tt>efibootmgr</tt> getting pulled in as a dependency. This is expected and good.
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<console># ##i##cd /mnt/funtoo
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# ##i##wget http://build.funtoo.org/funtoo-current/x86-64bit/generic_64/stage3-latest.tar.xz
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</console>
  
=== Installing GRUB ===
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Note que sistemas 64-bit pode rodar stages 32-bit ou 64-bit, mas o sistema 32-bit podem somente rodar stages de 32-bit. Certifique-se de selecionar um Stage 3 que é apropriado para o seu CPU (processador). Se não estiver certo, é uma aposta segura escolher o stage <code>generic_64</code> ou <code>generic_32</code>. Consulte a página de [[Download]] para mais informações.
 
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Now, for the magic of getting everything in place for booting. You should copy your kernel and initramfs (if you have one -- you will if you are following the default install) to <tt>/boot</tt>. GRUB will boot those. But how do we get UEFI to boot GRUB? Well, we need to run the following command:
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Uma vez o stage for baixado, extraia os conteúdos com o seguinte comand, substituindo o nome nome real pelo seu stage 3 tarball:
 
<console>
 
<console>
# ##i##grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/boot /dev/sda
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# ##i##tar xpf stage3-latest.tar.xz
 
</console>
 
</console>
This command will simply install all the stuff to <tt>/boot/EFI</tt> and <tt>/boot/grub</tt> that your system needs to boot. In particular, the <tt>/boot/EFI/grub/grubx64.efi</tt> file will be created. This is the GRUB boot image that UEFI will load and start.
 
=== Configuring GRUB ===
 
 
OK, now UEFI has the GRUB image it needs to boot. But we still need to configure GRUB itself so it finds and boots your kernel and initramfs. This is done by performing the following steps. Since boot-update doesn't yet support UEFI, we will not use boot-update directly and will create a <tt>/boot/grub/grub.cfg</tt> file manually that looks like this:
 
 
 
<pre>
 
set timeout=3
 
set gfxmode=auto
 
insmod efi_gop
 
insmod efi_uga
 
 
menuentry "Funtoo Linux genkernel - kernel-debian-sources-x86_64-3.2.35-2" { 
 
    insmod part_gpt
 
    insmod fat 
 
    set root=(hostdisk//dev/sda,gpt1) 
 
    search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set __REPLACE_UUID_OF_SDA1__
 
    linux /kernel-debian-sources-x86_64-3.2.35-2 real_root=/dev/sda3
 
    initrd /initramfs-debian-sources-x86_64-3.2.35-2 
 
    set gfxpayload=keep
 
}
 
set default=0
 
</pre>
 
 
Note the <tt>search</tt> line where it says '''<tt>__REPLACE_UUID_OF_SDA1__</tt>''' above. You will need to run '''<tt>blkid /dev/sda1</tt>''' and use the UUID value that is displayed. For example, on my system, I need to use '''<tt>C34B-19CF</tt>'''. You can also change the <tt>menuentry</tt> line text in quotes to say whatever you want, and the <tt>linux</tt> and <tt>initrd</tt> lines should reference your kernel versions in <tt>/boot</tt>. As above, use the path <tt>/</tt> instead of <tt>/boot</tt> as the path should be relative to the root of the VFAT filesystem.
 
 
== Known Issues ==
 
With pure UEFI boot mode, with legacy mode disabled, following error expected:
 
* video driver not supported, boot hangs, hard reboot required.
 
Choose UEFI first, next legacy driver. It depends on motherboard vendor and efi bios version.
 
In UEFI bios choose grub option, if your succeeded with above guide, additional menu should appear in Boot Menu, otherwise it boots into EFI shell:
 
* grub:NAME of you hard drive
 
 
=== Done! ===
 
 
Remember to follow all other steps in the regular Funtoo Install Guide. Assuming you did everything correctly, your system should now boot via UEFI! We will be adding UEFI support to boot-update soon to make this process easier.
 
  
[[Category:HOWTO]]
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{{important|é muito importante utilizar <code>tar's</code> "<code>'''p'''</code>" option when extracting the Stage 3 tarball - it tells <code>tar</code> to ''preserve'' any permissions and ownership that exist within the archive. Without this option, your Funtoo Linux filesystem permissions will be incorrect.}}

Revision as of 18:51, December 13, 2014

Instalndo o Stage 3 tarball

Depois de criar os filesystems, o próximo passo é baixar o Stage 3 tarball inicial. O Stage 3 é um sistema pré-compiled utilizado como um ponto inicial para instalar o Funtoo Linux. Carregue um dos seguintes URLs em outra janela do navegador:

Agora, vamos navegar pelos diretórios nos mirrors para encontrar o build apropriado do Funtoo Linux para você.

Qual Build?

Se não estiver certo, escolha funtoo-current.

Funtoo Linux possui vários 'builds' diferentes, ou variantes. Here is a list of the various builds that are available, and what their distinctive features are:

BuildDescription
funtoo-currentThe most commonly-selected build of Funtoo Linux. Receives rapid updates and preferred by desktop users.
funtoo-current-hardenedSame package set as funtoo-current, but with a hardened, exploit-resistant toolchain.
funtoo-stableEmphasizes less-frequent package updates and trusted, reliable versions of packages over the latest versions.

If you want to read more about this, have a look at Differences between stable, current and experimental.

What Architecture?

If you're not sure, pick x86-64bit, or possibly pure64 for server systems.

For PC-compatible systems, the following choices are available:

ArchitectureDescription
x86-64bitFor modern 64-bit processors. Uses new 64-bit instructions and address space. Maintains 32-bit compatibility with multilib.
pure64For modern 64-bit processors but with no support for 32-bit compatibility.
x86-32bitFor older 32-bit systems such as Athlon XP, Pentium 4, or earlier Atom.

Your SubArch

Inside /funtoo-current/x86-64bit/ on one of our mirrors, you'll see a bunch of directories for various subarches of Funtoo Linux. Subarches are builds of Funtoo Linux that are designed to run on a particular type of CPU, to offer the best possible performance. They also take advantage of the instruction sets available for each CPU.

If you are using an AMD-based CPU, download a stage3 from generic_64, amd64-k8, amd64-k10, amd64-bulldozer, amd64-piledriver, amd64-steamroller or amd64-jaguar. See our list of 64-bit AMD subarches for help figuring out which one is best for you.

If you are using an Intel-based CPU, download a stage3 from generic_64, atom_64, core2_64 or corei7. Note that corei7 is ideal for any modern Intel processor, including Core i3 and Core i5, and many Xeons. our list of 64-bit Intel subarches for help figuring out which one is best for you.

If you are using a 32-bit CPU, download a stage3 from generic_32, i686, core2_32, atom_32 or athlon-xp.

Setting the Date

Important

If your system's date and time are too far off (typically by months or years,) then it may prevent Portage from properly downloading source tarballs. This is because some of our sources are downloaded via HTTPS, which use SSL certificates and are marked with an activation and expiration date. However, if you system time is relatively close to correct, you can probably skip this step for now.

Now is a good time to verify the date and time are correctly set to UTC. Use the date command to verify the date and time:

# date
Fri Jul 15 19:47:18 UTC 2011

If the date and/or time need to be corrected, do so using date MMDDhhmmYYYY, keeping in mind hhmm are in 24-hour format. The example below changes the date and time to "July 16th, 2011 @ 8:00PM" UTC:

# date 071620002011
Fri Jul 16 20:00:00 UTC 2011

Uma vez que você tenha definido o sistema de horário (system clock), é uma boa ideia copiar o horário para o sistema de horas do seu hardware (hardware clock), assim ele persiste nos reboots:

# hwclock --systohc

Baixe o Stage3

Uma vez que você está no root filesystem do seu Funtoo Linux, utilize wget para baixar o Stage 3 tarball que você escolheu utilizar como base para o seu novo sistema Funtoo Linux. Ele deve se salvo no direorio /mnt/funtoo como a seguir:

# cd /mnt/funtoo
# wget http://build.funtoo.org/funtoo-current/x86-64bit/generic_64/stage3-latest.tar.xz

Note que sistemas 64-bit pode rodar stages 32-bit ou 64-bit, mas o sistema 32-bit podem somente rodar stages de 32-bit. Certifique-se de selecionar um Stage 3 que é apropriado para o seu CPU (processador). Se não estiver certo, é uma aposta segura escolher o stage generic_64 ou generic_32. Consulte a página de Download para mais informações.

Uma vez o stage for baixado, extraia os conteúdos com o seguinte comand, substituindo o nome nome real pelo seu stage 3 tarball:

# tar xpf stage3-latest.tar.xz

Important

é muito importante utilizar tar's "p" option when extracting the Stage 3 tarball - it tells tar to preserve any permissions and ownership that exist within the archive. Without this option, your Funtoo Linux filesystem permissions will be incorrect.