Difference between pages "Funtoo Linux Installation" and "Install/Finish"

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<noinclude>
== Introduction ==
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{{Note|This is a template that is used as part of the Installation instructions, which covers performing finishing steps such as setting a root password and rebooting into Funtoo Linux. Templates are being used to allow multiple variant install guides that use most of the same re-usable parts.}}
 
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</noinclude>
This document was written to help you install Funtoo Linux as concisely as possible, with a minimum number of distracting options regarding system configuration.
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These docs assume you have a "PC compatible" computer system with a standard PC BIOS. Many new computers support UEFI for booting, which is a new firmware interface that frequently replaces the older MBR-based BIOS. If you have a system with UEFI, you will want to use this documentation along with the [[UEFI Install Guide]], which will augment these instructions and explain how to get your system to boot. You may need to change your PC BIOS settings to enable or disable UEFI booting. The [[UEFI Install Guide]] has more information on this, and steps on how to determine if your system supports UEFI.
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We also offer a [[ZFS Install Guide]], which augment the instructions on this page for those who want to install Funtoo Linux on ZFS.  If you are installing Funtoo Linux on [[Funtoo Linux Installation on ARM|ARM]] architecture, please see [[Funtoo Linux Installation on ARM]] for notable differences regarding ARM support. An experimental Funtoo Linux build also exists for [[Funtoo Linux Installation on SPARC|SPARC]] platforms. See [[Funtoo Linux Installation on SPARC]].
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New  [[F2FS Install Guide]] is in progress  which will augment the instructions on this page for those who want to install Funtoo Linux on F2FS.
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If you've had previous experience installing Gentoo Linux then a lot of steps will be familiar, but you should still read through as there are a few differences.
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== Installation Overview ==
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This is a basic overview of the Funtoo installation process:
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# [[#Live CD|Download and boot the live CD of your choice]].
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# [[#Prepare Hard Disk|Prepare your disk]].
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# [[#Creating filesystems|Create]] and [[#Mounting filesystems|mount]] filesystems.
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# [[#Installing the Stage 3 tarball|Install the Funtoo stage tarball]] of your choice.
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# [[#Chroot into Funtoo|Chroot into your new system]].
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# [[#Downloading the Portage tree|Download the Portage tree]].
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# [[#Configuring your system|Configure your system]] and [[#Configuring your network|network]].
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# [[#Configuring and installing the Linux kernel|Install a kernel]].
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# [[#Installing a Bootloader|Install a bootloader]].
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# [[#Finishing Steps|Complete final steps]].
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# [[#Restart your system|Reboot and enjoy]].
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=== Live CD ===
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Funtoo doesn't provide an "official" Funtoo Live CD, but there are plenty of good ones out there to choose from. A great choice is the Gentoo-based [http://www.sysresccd.org/ System Rescue CD] as it contains lots of tools and utilities and supports both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. For a generation 2 Hyper-V system, the [http://www.ubuntu.com/ Ubuntu] desktop install DVD as of version 14.04.1 works well enough. Gentoo CDs don't support EFI boot, and the System Rescue CD lacks appropriate graphics support for Hyper-V as of version 4.4.0.
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It is also possible to install Funtoo Linux using many other Linux-based live CDs. Generally, any modern bootable Linux live CD or live USB media will work. See [[Requirements|requirements]] for an overview of what the Live Media must provide to allow a problem-free install of Funtoo Linux.
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To begin a Funtoo Linux installation, download System Rescue CD from:
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{{MirrorList}}
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Or, use your preferred live media. Insert it into your disc drive, and boot from it. If using an older version of System Rescue CD, '''be sure to select the <code>rescue64</code> kernel at the boot menu if you are installing a 64-bit system'''. By default, System Rescue CD used to boot in 32-bit mode though the latest version attempts to automatically detect 64-bit processors.
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{{:Install/Partitioning}}
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{{:Install/Stage3}}
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{{:Install/Chroot}}
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{{:Install/PortageTree}}
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{{:Install/Configuring}}
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{{:Install/Portage}}
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{{:Install/Kernel}}
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{{:Install/BootLoader}}
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{{:Install/Network}}
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=== Finishing Steps ===
 
=== Finishing Steps ===
  
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You should now see your system reboot, the GRUB boot loader appear for a few seconds, and then see the Linux kernel and initramfs loading. After this, you should see Funtoo Linux itself start to boot, and you should be greeted with a <code>login:</code> prompt. Funtoo Linux has been successfully installed!
 
You should now see your system reboot, the GRUB boot loader appear for a few seconds, and then see the Linux kernel and initramfs loading. After this, you should see Funtoo Linux itself start to boot, and you should be greeted with a <code>login:</code> prompt. Funtoo Linux has been successfully installed!
 
=== Profiles ===
 
 
Once you have rebooted into Funtoo Linux, you can further customize your system to your needs by using Funtoo Profiles.
 
 
[[Funtoo 1.0 Profile|Funtoo profiles]] are used to define defaults for Portage specific to your needs. There are 4 basic profile types: arch, build, [[Flavors and Mix-ins|flavor, and mix-ins]]:
 
 
;arch: typically <code>x86-32bit</code> or <code>x86-64bit</code>, this defines the processor type and support of your system. This is defined when your stage was built and should not be changed.
 
;build: defines whether your system is a <code>current</code>, <code>stable</code> or <code>experimental</code> build. <code>current</code> systems will have newer packages unmasked than <code>stable</code> systems.
 
;flavor: defines the general type of system, such as <code>server</code> or <code>desktop</code>, and will set default USE flags appropriate for your needs.
 
;mix-ins: define various optional settings that you may be interested in enabling.
 
 
One arch, build and flavor must be set for each Funtoo Linux system, while mix-ins are optional and you can enable more than one if desired.
 
 
Remember that profiles can often be inherited. For example, the <code>desktop</code> flavor inherits the <code>workstation</code> flavor settings, which in turn inherits the <code>X</code> and <code>audio</code> mix-ins. You can view this by using eselect:
 
 
<console>
 
(chroot) # ##i##eselect profile show
 
Currently set profiles:
 
    arch: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/arch/x86-64bit
 
  build: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/build/current
 
  flavor: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/flavor/desktop
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/kde
 
 
Automatically enabled profiles:
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/print
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/X
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/audio
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/dvd
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/media
 
mix-ins: gentoo:funtoo/1.0/linux-gnu/mix-ins/console-extras
 
</console>
 
 
To view installed profiles:
 
<console>
 
(chroot) # ##i##eselect profile list
 
</console>
 
 
To change the profile flavor:
 
<console>
 
(chroot) # ##i##eselect profile set-flavor 7
 
</console>
 
 
To add a mix-in:
 
 
<console>
 
(chroot) # ##i##eselect profile add 10
 
</console>
 
 
===Next Steps===
 
 
If you are brand new to Funtoo Linux and Gentoo Linux, please check out [[Funtoo Linux First Steps]], which will help get you acquainted with your new system. We also have a category for our [[:Category:Official Documentation|official documentation]], which includes all docs that we officially maintain for installation and operation of Funtoo Linux.
 
 
We also have a number of pages dedicated to setting up your system, which you can find below. If you are interested in adding a page to this list, add it to the "First Steps" MediaWiki category.
 
 
{{#ask: [[Category:First Steps]] | format=ul }}
 
 
If your system did not boot correctly, see [[Installation Troubleshooting]] for steps you can take to resolve the problem.
 
 
[[Category:HOWTO]]
 
[[Category:Install]]
 
[[Category:Official Documentation]]
 
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Revision as of 05:38, November 12, 2014

Note

This is a template that is used as part of the Installation instructions, which covers performing finishing steps such as setting a root password and rebooting into Funtoo Linux. Templates are being used to allow multiple variant install guides that use most of the same re-usable parts.

Finishing Steps

Set your root password

It's imperative that you set your root password before rebooting so that you can log in.

(chroot) # passwd

Restart your system

Now is the time to leave chroot, to unmount Funtoo Linux partitions and files and to restart your computer. When you restart, the GRUB boot loader will start, load the Linux kernel and initramfs, and your system will begin booting.

Leave the chroot, change directory to /mnt, unmount your Funtoo partitions, and reboot.

(chroot) # exit
# cd /mnt
# umount -l funtoo
# reboot

Note

System Rescue CD will gracefully unmount your new Funtoo filesystems as part of its normal shutdown sequence.

You should now see your system reboot, the GRUB boot loader appear for a few seconds, and then see the Linux kernel and initramfs loading. After this, you should see Funtoo Linux itself start to boot, and you should be greeted with a login: prompt. Funtoo Linux has been successfully installed!